Space

 

Bravo to you, Mrs. Hawking! Bless you from the whole world.

This Was Stephen Hawking’s Last Words To The World

Unexplained Mysteries
Published on May 22, 2019

This was Stephen Hawking’s last words to the world. We take a look at one of Stephen Hawking’s last message to the world. Over the years there have been hundreds of predictions made and some of these have come true. Many different people from across the world make predictions about the future of humankind in an attempt to better understand and combat changing industries, personal obstacles, and events that may spell out doom for the rest of us. These predictions could come from self proclaimed psychics, emerging technologies in artificial intelligence, investors looking to predict future decisions and impacts on the economy or government research to provide intelligence relative to policy impact and decision making.

One individual that did make some interesting predictions was professor Stephen Hawking.

Thank you for watching!

Thank you to CO.AG for the background music!

This man is a hero and not just to me. Our generation’s Einstein. Such a spectacularly tuned mind. We had best heed his thoughts. Seriously.

 

 

Mars 2020 pass

I am quite proud to have my name on this one, not least because it has microphones! Well, at least one, hopefully two because stereo.

My name’s etched into previous craft, too, but this one is equipped to find critters. And hear them. But hey, just the wind’d be good, eh.

The rover is scheduled to launch as early as July 2020, with the spacecraft expected to touch down on Mars in February 2021.

Go NASA!

Get your name up there, eh… mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/mars2020/

 

 

What Huygens Saw On Titan – New Image Processing

VideoFromSpace
Published on Jan 14, 2015

For the probe landing’s 10th anniversary, a new sequence has been rendered from Huygens’ Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) data. The craft landed on Saturn’s largest moon on 14 Jan 2005. — Landing Animation: http://goo.gl/6t6XuA

Credit: Erich Karkoschka, DISR team, University of Arizona

Good stuff.

 

 

Milky Way

Milky Way Galaxy above Verde Island, Philippines using my friend’s Huawei Mate 20

photos-of-space

Huawei phones have Leica cameras.

Screw you, Trump.

 

 

Octo Pi are the coolest.

In fact, many scientists suspect an off-Earth origin. =O

be well

 

 

jerrie cobb

America’s first female astronaut candidate, pilot Jerrie Cobb, who pushed for equality in space but never reached its heights, has died at her home in Florida.

Cobb died March 18 following a brief illness, said Miles O’Brien, a family spokesman. She was 88.

In 1961, Cobb became the first woman to pass NASA’s astronaut screening process. Altogether, 13 women passed the arduous physical testing regimen and became known as the Mercury 13. But NASA already had its Mercury 7 astronauts, all jet test pilots and all military men, and none of the Mercury 13 ever reached space, which left Cobb bitter.

“We seek, only, a place in our nation’s space future without discrimination,” she later told a special House subcommittee on the selection of astronauts.

Instead of making her an astronaut, NASA tapped her as a consultant to promote the space program. But she was dismissed after commenting: “I’m the most unconsulted consultant in any government agency.”

“My country, my culture, was not ready to allow a woman to fly in space.”

Truly sad. We’ve since grown out of that phase, but I am saddened that such brave and excellent people as Jerrie Cobb never got to shine.

Just think how proud we would have been.

This story here via my dear friend Margaret O’Brien

 

 

real black hole

Black Hole Image Makes History

Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. Credit: Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration
› Larger view

jpl

A black hole and its shadow have been captured in an image for the first time, a historic feat by an international network of radio telescopes called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). EHT is an international collaboration whose support in the U.S. includes the National Science Foundation.

A black hole is an extremely dense object from which no light can escape. Anything that comes within a black hole’s “event horizon,” its point of no return, will be consumed, never to re-emerge, because of the black hole’s unimaginably strong gravity. By its very nature, a black hole cannot be seen, but the hot disk of material that encircles it shines bright. Against a bright backdrop, such as this disk, a black hole appears to cast a shadow.

The stunning new image shows the shadow of the supermassive black hole in the center of Messier 87 (M87), an elliptical galaxy some 55 million light-years from Earth. This black hole is 6.5 billion times the mass of the Sun. Catching its shadow involved eight ground-based radio telescopes around the globe, operating together as if they were one telescope the size of our entire planet.

“This is an amazing accomplishment by the EHT team,” said Paul Hertz, director of the astrophysics division at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Years ago, we thought we would have to build a very large space telescope to image a black hole. By getting radio telescopes around the world to work in concert like one instrument, the EHT team achieved this, decades ahead of time.”

To complement the EHT findings, several NASA spacecraft were part of a large effort, coordinated by the EHT’s Multiwavelength Working Group, to observe the black hole using different wavelengths of light. As part of this effort, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory space telescope missions, all attuned to different varieties of X-ray light, turned their gaze to the M87 black hole around the same time as the Event Horizon Telescope in April 2017. If EHT observed changes in the structure of the black hole’s environment, data from these missions and other telescopes could be used to help figure out what was going on.

While NASA observations did not directly trace out the historic image, astronomers used data from NASA’s Chandra and NuSTAR satellites to measure the X-ray brightness of M87’s jet. Scientists used this information to compare their models of the jet and disk around the black hole with the EHT observations. Other insights may come as researchers continue to pore over these data.

There are many remaining questions about black holes that the coordinated NASA observations may help answer. Mysteries linger about why particles get such a huge energy boost around black holes, forming dramatic jets that surge away from the poles of black holes at nearly the speed of light. When material falls into the black hole, where does the energy go?

“X-rays help us connect what’s happening to the particles near the event horizon with what we can measure with our telescopes,” said Joey Neilsen, an astronomer at Villanova University in Pennsylvania, who led the Chandra and NuSTAR analysis on behalf of the EHT’s Multiwavelength Working Group.

NASA space telescopes have previously studied a jet extending more than 1,000 light-years away from the center of M87. The jet is made of particles traveling near the speed of light, shooting out at high energies from close to the event horizon. The EHT was designed in part to study the origin of this jet and others like it. A blob of matter in the jet called HST-1, discovered by Hubble astronomers in 1999, has undergone a mysterious cycle of brightening and dimming.

Chandra, NuSTAR and Swift, as well as NASA’s Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) experiment on the International Space Station, also looked at the black hole at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy, called Sagittarius A*, in coordination with EHT.

Getting so many different telescopes on the ground and in space to all look toward the same celestial object is a huge undertaking in and of itself, scientists emphasize.

“Scheduling all of these coordinated observations was a really hard problem for both the EHT and the Chandra and NuSTAR mission planners,” Neilsen said. “They did really incredible work to get us the data that we have, and we’re exceedingly grateful.”

Neilsen and colleagues who were part of the coordinated observations will be working on dissecting the entire spectrum of light coming from the M87 black hole, all the way from low-energy radio waves to high-energy gamma rays. With so much data from EHT and other telescopes, scientists may have years of discoveries ahead.

News Media Contact

Elizabeth Landau
NASA Headquarters, Washington
818-359-3241
[email protected]

2019-062

WoW!!! Bravo!!!

 

 

smart people

NASA Before PowerPoint In 1961. Credit: NASA

Via Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin

These are called smart people. Not many of them around these days.

 

 

full metal

FULL METAL ASTEROID  Long ago, molten iron could have erupted from the metal asteroid Psyche (illustrated in cross section) in a process dubbed ferrovolcanism, new studies suggest.

Metal asteroids may have once had iron-spewing volcanoes

An upcoming NASA mission could look for signs of past ‘ferrovolcanism’ on asteroid Psyche

by Lisa Grossman 1:23PM, April 3, 2019

Imagine a metal asteroid spewing molten iron, and you’ve got the gist of ferrovolcanism — a new type of planetary activity proposed recently by two research teams.

When NASA launches a probe to a metal asteroid called Psyche in 2022, planetary scientists will be able to search for signs of such volcanic activity in the object’s past. The new research “is the first time anyone has worked out what volcanism is likely to look like on these asteroids,” says planetary scientist Jacob Abrahams of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Metal asteroids are thought to be the exposed iron-rich cores of planetesimals that suffered a catastrophic collision as the solar system was developing, before they could grow into full-sized planets. The naked core would have been exposed to cold space while still molten. And it would have cooled and solidified from the outside in, forming a solid iron crust that would be denser than the underlying molten iron, say Abrahams and planetary scientist Francis Nimmo, also of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

That kind of density mismatch is… Read the rest!

Whoa, just think… volcanoes… and nothin’ but volcanoes!

 

 

gus grissom

David Blanchflower BSc @DavidBflower 1:36 AM – 3 Apr 2019

It’s 3 April. On this day in 1926 Virgil “Gus” Grissom was born. One of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts. Flew on Mercury Redstone-4 (Liberty Bell 7) and Gemini 3 (Molly Brown). NASA picture.

Gus will always be a Hero. This is late, sorry, it has been bonkers around here.

 

 

ryugu

 

ryugu

 

ryugu

 

ryugu

 

posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 01:33 AM
Hayabusa 2 rovers send new images from Ryugu surface
www.bbc.com…


The photos reveal new details of the surface of the space rock, which is known as Ryugu.

On 21 September, the rovers were released on to the surface by the “mothership”, Hayabusa 2.

Hayabusa 2 reached Ryugu in June after a three-and-a-half-year journey.

The pictures show in clear relief the rugged, boulder-strewn landscape of this striking Solar System body.

The robots, known as Rover 1A and Rover 1B, are now both confirmed to be working on the surface of the space rock.

The 1kg autonomous rovers move about by hopping, using the asteroid’s low gravity. Each one contains a motor-powered internal mass that rotates to generate force, propelling the robot across the surface.

Some more pictures from the source:


Rover 1B also sent back the first video footage from the surface of an asteroid.

although it won’t play on this news source….

Here is the .gif of the captures…plus other pictures of the surface > HAYABUSA2 TWITTER FEED

As Hayabusa2 descended towards Ryugu to deploy the MINERVA-II1 rovers, the ONC-T camera snapped the highest resolution image yet of the asteroid surface!

www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp…

 

MINERVA-II1 rovers send images from asteroid Ryugu

SciNews
Published on Sep 27, 2018

JAXA’s Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2” deployed the MINERVA-II1 rovers to explore the surface of asteroid Ryugu on 21 September 2018. The MINERVA-II1 consists of two rovers, Rover-1A and Rover-1B, both landed on the surface of asteroid Ryugu and sent back images and a short movie. Credit : JAXA, University of Tokyo, Kochi University, Rikkyo University, Nagoya University, Chiba Institute of Technology, Meiji University, Aizu University, AIST

I have posted about this before, but it is always good to revisit things with a high coolness factor.

Dig it.

 

 

Giorgio! Thanks, man.

 

 

highest strangeness

What in the hell are these? I’m still waiting!

Lunar anomalies of the highest order by Lunakhod 13.

No, they are not off the spacecraft.

So…

 

 

Hey, just think if you could see this live and in person… would it not be a grand thing?

 

 

venera 13

This fantastic and uber-iconic image was taken on March 1st, 1982, by the Soviet spacecraft Venera 13. Venera had just landed on Venus and taken the first color images from the surface before it melted into a puddle shortly thereafter. Communist technology! Impressive that it lasted as long as it did.

 

 

stormy

Swirling clouds and an anticyclonic storm in Jupiter’s dynamic North-North Temperate Belt, captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

Fantabulous!

 

 

abby

Space Explorer Mike Retweeted

Rebecca Andersen @Becky_Andersen ba

11:05 AM – 22 Feb 2019

This Abby was so excited to put on her #NASA #FlightSuit just like ⁦@AstronautAbby⁩. 🚀#GirlsInSTEM #FlightSuitFriday #DreamBig

Music to my ears.

be well

 

 

The control panel

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin

The control panel that got us to the Moon!

Now that’s a thing o’ beauty, Cap’n!

The power of American engineering and know-how.

“There is no such thing as an unsolvable problem.” – Sergei Korolev, the lead Soviet rocket engineer and spacecraft designer

“The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever.” — Konstantin Tsiolkovsky

be well

 

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.”

― Carl Sagan, Cosmos

Beautiful, isn’t it?

 

 

Monoceros

Thought you all would enjoy this beautiful picture of the area known as Monoceros, the Unicorn. It’s an area of star formation. The star forming region is known as NGC 2464, about 2,700 light years distance from Earth. The image covers an area of the sky that is 3/4 of a degree or 1.5 full moons.

Link to source article

Image was produced by Stanislav Voldkiy using the Chilescope

eriktheawful, moderator.  Registered: 1/26/2012  Location: M42  Mood: Talking To A Br…

The wonders of nature.

Those wonders will neverever… cease to astound because nature never ends. No matter where, no matter when.

be well

 

 

marstruecolor

Space Explorer Mike Retweeted

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin Feb 15

Mars in true color shot by Curiosity

True color is good color.

 

 

dm

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin Feb 15

A “dog-meteorite” crashed on Earth this morning! Luckily there were no casualties.

Fabulous!

be well

 

 

LastImagebyOppy

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin

The very last image transmitted by Opportunity Mars Rover, on Sol 5111. Credit: NASA

My God! It’s full of stars!

Such a sad thing.

 

 

This is pretty cool, actually. So linear are those modulations, ooh!

 

 

sweet

 

sweet

A Black Hole is an extraordinarily massive, improbably dense knot of spacetime that makes a living swallowing or slinging away any morsel of energy that strays too close to its dark, twisted core. Anyone fortunate (or unfortunate) enough to directly observe one of these beasts in the wild would immediately notice the way its colossal gravitational field warps all of the light from the stars and galaxies behind it, a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing.

Thanks to the power of supercomputers, a curious observer no longer has to venture into outer space to see such a sight. A team of astronomers has released their first simulated images of the lensing effects of not just one, but two black holes, trapped in orbit by each other’s gravity and ultimately doomed to merge as one.

www.universetoday.com/116500/new-simulation-offers-stunning-images-of-black-hole-merger/?

Source: mirkokosmos

 

Sharpless 2-308

Sharpless 2-308: Star Bubble

Blown by fast winds from a hot, massive star, this cosmic bubble is huge. Cataloged as Sharpless 2-308 it lies some 5,200 light-years away toward the constellation of the Big Dog (Canis Major) and covers slightly more of the sky than a Full Moon. That corresponds to a diameter of 60 light-years at its estimated distance. The massive star that created the bubble, a Wolf-Rayet star, is the bright one near the center of the nebula. Wolf-Rayet stars have over 20 times the mass of the Sun and are thought to be in a brief, pre-supernova phase of massive star evolution. Fast winds from this Wolf-Rayet star create the bubble-shaped nebula as they sweep up slower moving material from an earlier phase of evolution. The windblown nebula has an age of about 70,000 years. Relatively faint emission captured in the expansive image is dominated by the glow of ionized oxygen atoms mapped to a blue hue. SH2-308 is also known as The Dolphin Nebula.

Credit: Laubing

Via: cosmicvastness

The wonders of Nature…

be well

 

storms

You Retweeted

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin Feb 2

Сloseup of Jupiter’s brutal weather systems. Credit: NASA/JPL

###

Brutal is an appropriate word! Winds only at a few hundred miles an hour.

 

Charles W. Shults III

We have a new Virtual Science Center being created. This is the first gallery, devoted to some of the results of the research that I have done. I also have a few links that you will enjoy with this.

A couple of TV news spots first…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzShK8u16tw   www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y68knv2vyYw

And some material about the book…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0IpS2ZmgzY

Enjoy, join us in our venture, and let’s have some feedback. This is a project we can all get behind!

www.shultslaboratories.com

Hey, hey, it’s my good friend Charles! An awesome dude who doesn’t get anywhere the recognition that he should… Ooh, I remember from years ago when he ran the best Mars forum the interwebs have ever seen. Seriously, it was fanfreakintastic. Such good people. Such good memories. And not a drop of woo!

So glad to hear that the findings from all those years are getting a place of their own. I pray it catches on, especially with the young folks. It’d be just grand!

be well

 

Fisheye Milky Way

Fisheye Milky Way, Happy with the turnout. — Sean Kintzle.

via photos-of-space’s reblog of space-pics’ post.

Pretty neat.

be well