science

 

I have blatantly stolen this post from Karl 12 and ATS in the interests of giving some base reference material to the newest UFOlogists. I know they’re real, I’ve seen a dozen or more.

Thread by karl 12, Writer-Fighter-Scholar
Registered: 10/20/2006  Location:  Mood:  Member is offline.
posted on Mar, 22 2010 @ 01:02 PM
Direct link to this post

“The Air Force had put out a secret order for its pilots to capture UFOs. For the last six months we have been working with a congressional committee investigating official secrecy concerning proof that UFOs are real machines under intelligent…..”

Major Donald Keyhoe, during a live TV broadcast on CBS in 1958 in which he was pulled from the air when he began to deviate from the prepared format of the programme.

Major Donald Keyhoe’s archives have now been made available free on line – for those who don’t know of him he was a very important chap in the history of UFO research and co-founder of the NICAP organisation in 1956.

The archives cover a great deal of topics involved with the UFO subject such as historical and global reports, government documents, scientific papers, police encounters, newspaper articles etc.. as well as coverage of specific UFO incidents and press conferences from the Pentagon and U.N.

They also contain some very interesting interviews and comments from such people as Dr James E. Mcdonald, Hermann Oberth, Jan Aldrich, Francis Ridge, Ted Bloecher, Wendy Connors, Barry Greenwood etc.. and observations about government sponsered UFO panels like the Condon committee and Robertson Panel.

Archives:
keyhoe

“The Keyhoe Archives includes significant UFO research material from Major Donald Keyhoe, Richard Hall, the Fund for UFO Research, Isabel Davis, Ted Bloecher, Dr. James McDonald, Marshall Cleaver..

Journal of UFO History – A Publication of the Donald E. Keyhoe Archives

Bio:

Donald Keyhoe graduated from the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD, in 1920, with a BS degree and a commission as a second lieutenant in the USMC. Keyhoe became a Naval aviator, piloting both balloons and airplanes in the period between the World Wars. After a flying accident in Guam he was medically retired from the military. During World War II he was recalled to active duty with the rank of major in the USMC.

When the first “flying saucer” sightings were reported in June,1947, Keyhoe, an experienced pilot, was skeptical. True asked him to investigate UFOs in 1949. He interviewed numerous pilots as well as military officers in the Pentagon. Keyhoe discovered that expert observers had seen the unexplained discs, many at close range. His article “Flying Saucers Are Real” in the January,1950 issue of True became one of the most widely read and discussed articles in publishing history, and caused a sensation. In January, 1950, the article was expanded into a paperback book. In 1957, Keyhoe became Director of the newly formed National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP) in Washington, DC. Under Keyhoe’s leadership NICAP gave serious publicity to the UFO phenomena throughout the 1960s and encouraged subsequent Congressional hearings.

Link

Related Links:

Extended Biography – books and articles.

Major Keyhoe gets cut off air – USAF Censorship of TV broadcast?

Major Keyhoe – sound-clip audio collection.

Many thanks to Karl 12 for this. Enjoy the riches, eh?

 

 

The History of Speculative Zoology – Part 1

Ben G Thomas
Published on Mar 10, 2019

Speculative Zoology is a very fun topic to talk about. It also has a pretty long history going back more than 100 years, so we’re going to take a look at some of these past projects.

Join our Discord server: discord.gg/3KgpG8J Subscribe to our subreddit: www.reddit.com/r/BenGThomas

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Sources: tetzoo.com/podcast/ (Tetrapod Zoology Podcast Episode 69: The SpecZoo Podcats) speculativeevolution.wikia.com… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specula… blogs.scientificamerican.com/… blogs.scientificamerican.com/… blogs.scientificamerican.com/… speculativeevolution.wikia.com… blogs.scientificamerican.com/… tetzoo.com/blog/2018/9/16/the-… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellucidar en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_an… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinogr… profjoecain.net/rhinogradentia/ www.sivatherium.narod.ru/libra…

I remember when the Dinosauroid was introduced to the unsuspecting world. I loved it! Another great BGT vid! Dig it.

be well

 

 

4 Real-Life Modern Sightings That Prove Living Dinosaurs Still Exist

Dark Matter
Published on Aug 17, 2017

Around 65 million years ago, all Dinosaurs, and most of the co-surviving lifeforms supposedly went extinct. But according to certain witnesses, a few managed to survive. So, from the Raptors of the US, to the T-Rex of Australia, Join us…

If you enjoyed this video don’t forget to like, share and subscribe…
/www.youtube.com/watch?v=CblyQ…

/www.youtube.com/watch?v=RT5jg…
And follow us on Social Media to keep up with the latest videos…
/twitter.com/Apokalips212
/www.facebook.com/www.darkmatt…

Music Used: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b73t9…

Thank you very much for watching, until next time…

I didn’t have much hope for this one because it has “prove” in the title. It’s not proof, of course, but it is very well done and the cases are well presented. I’m familiar with all but a precious few of the mentions. As for myself, I am definitely on board with all of these, especially the ones in the United States. Including the spiders… people relentlessly tell me of the allegedly natural limitation on their internal airways. I counter with the information that Mother Nature has little concern for the ideas of man.

be well

 

 

venera 13

This fantastic and uber-iconic image was taken on March 1st, 1982, by the Soviet spacecraft Venera 13. Venera had just landed on Venus and taken the first color images from the surface before it melted into a puddle shortly thereafter. Communist technology! Impressive that it lasted as long as it did.

 

 

The control panel

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin

The control panel that got us to the Moon!

Now that’s a thing o’ beauty, Cap’n!

The power of American engineering and know-how.

“There is no such thing as an unsolvable problem.” – Sergei Korolev, the lead Soviet rocket engineer and spacecraft designer

“The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever.” — Konstantin Tsiolkovsky

be well

 

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.”

― Carl Sagan, Cosmos

Beautiful, isn’t it?

 

 

Matheronodon provincialis

You Retweeted

Studio 252MYA @studio252mya 10:09 AM – 28 Feb 2019

Matheronodon provincialis by @JoschuaKnuppe Giant ­“duckbill” dinosaurs had hundreds of small teeth packed together like a grinding stone. But their relatives—rhabdodontids like Matheronodon—had a few oversized chisel-like teeth. 252mya.com/joschua-knueppe?utm_source=twitter

Isn’t this a neat little creature?

be well

 

 

Naturally this locked onto my Fortean eye… and it is rather indeed rather interesting! On tumblr, captain-price-official reblogged carnival-phantasm, who had posted this from allthebrazilianpolitics.

Mystery surrounds humpback whale found dead in depths of Brazil’s Amazon jungle

Wildlife experts only found huge mammal after following birds of prey scavenging on carcass

whale

Brazilian wildlife experts have been left baffled after discovering a dead humpback whale in the Amazon rainforest.

The 10-ton mammal was found in the jungle undergrowth on the island of Marajo, which sits at the mouth of the Amazon River.

Although scientists presume the enormous creature was hurled onshore during a storm, they do not understand how it came so far inland or why it was swimming off the coast in the first place.

Officials from Para state’s health, sanitation and environment department said they only found the 11m-long whale after following the birds of prey which were scavenging on its huge carcass.

The remains were deposited in such a remote part of the mangrove swamp in the Amazonian delta that it took two trips for the wildlife experts to reach the site.

Marine specialists from the Bicho D’agua Institute, a conservation group based on Marajo, are part of the team examining the whale, which is thought to have died several days before it was found.

Continue reading.

carnival-phantasm

That’s just how it be in Brazil

Source: independent.co.uk

Fan-freakin-tastic!

ETA: Further digs reveal that the dearly departed was just 50 feet off the beach! So much for mystery.

 

 

A few years ago, geologist Abderrazak El Albani and his team at the Institut de chimie des milieux et matériaux de Poitiers (CNRS/Université de Poitiers) discovered the oldest existing fossils of multicellular organisms in a deposit in Gabon. Located in the Franceville Basin, the deposit allowed scientists to re-date the appearance of multicellular life on Earth to 2.1 billion years—approximately 1.5 billion years earlier than previously thought (600 million). At the time, the researchers showed that this rich biodiversity co-occurred with a peak in dioxygenation of the atmosphere, and developed in a calm and shallow marine environment.

In this same geological deposit, the team has now uncovered the existence of fossilised traces of motility. This shows that certain multicellular organisms in this primitive marine ecosystem were sophisticated enough to move through its mud, rich in organic matter.

phys.org…

Via

This news is such sweet music to my ears.  The more ancient things are, the more I like them. This discovery… that there was a critter with legs that long ago fits in so well with my thoughts on the way things were. And in a way my thoughts on certain things in the here and now.

Delicious…!

 

 

Proceratosaurus

@serpenillus
15.02.2019 – 4 days ago

Proceratosaurus rests, sitting on the floor of a forest clearing. Proceratosaurus was an early Tyrannosauroid (early relative of T. rex) from Middle Jurassic England. Proceratosaurus is related to other early, fluffy tyrannosauroids like Guanlong, they are all in the family proceratosauridae. This is a WIP far from being finished. One of the things that I want to achieve is to add more areas of translucency in the crest, that allow some filtered sunlight to pass through.

Terrific talent, eh what?!

 

 

LastImagebyOppy

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin

The very last image transmitted by Opportunity Mars Rover, on Sol 5111. Credit: NASA

My God! It’s full of stars!

Such a sad thing.

 

 

This is pretty cool, actually. So linear are those modulations, ooh!

 

 

sweet

 

sweet

A Black Hole is an extraordinarily massive, improbably dense knot of spacetime that makes a living swallowing or slinging away any morsel of energy that strays too close to its dark, twisted core. Anyone fortunate (or unfortunate) enough to directly observe one of these beasts in the wild would immediately notice the way its colossal gravitational field warps all of the light from the stars and galaxies behind it, a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing.

Thanks to the power of supercomputers, a curious observer no longer has to venture into outer space to see such a sight. A team of astronomers has released their first simulated images of the lensing effects of not just one, but two black holes, trapped in orbit by each other’s gravity and ultimately doomed to merge as one.

www.universetoday.com/116500/new-simulation-offers-stunning-images-of-black-hole-merger/?

Source: mirkokosmos

 

Utah UFO’s Speed Finally Calculated (*Backed by Math) and It’s Shocking

brian hanley
Published on Jan 30, 2019

Check out Rob Woodus’ channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCD99…
Rob’s 1st video: youtu.be/cFN7KofHpcY
Rob’s 2nd video: youtu.be/scdK5xcbV-k

Deep Space by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (creativecommons.org/licenses/…) Artist: audionautix.com/

Nicely done. Same result as before, but with two more added for different starting points. Shocking, indeed.

Oh, hey, here is a quickie. Please note that I do NOT endorse the use of the term “cockpit.” That’s a dangerous leap.

Stunning NEW Enhanced Images of Utah UFO Reveal the Craft Has a Cockpit!

brian hanley
Published on Feb 6, 2019

New enhanced images sent to me by EG (AKA Evil Lemon) reveal that the Utah UFO has a cockpit. What do you see?

SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS: youtu.be/4yRlWmk6p-w
RAW FOOTAGE: www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVmGh…
ORIGINAL VIDEO: www.youtube.com/watch?v=cE-Yr…
INTERVIEW: www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlIc-…

Brian needs to stay strong and avoid the evil WOO!

be well

 

This thing looks fantastic and if used properly likely game-changing.

Want to dig deeper into it.

be well

 

Charles W. Shults III

We have a new Virtual Science Center being created. This is the first gallery, devoted to some of the results of the research that I have done. I also have a few links that you will enjoy with this.

A couple of TV news spots first…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzShK8u16tw   www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y68knv2vyYw

And some material about the book…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0IpS2ZmgzY

Enjoy, join us in our venture, and let’s have some feedback. This is a project we can all get behind!

www.shultslaboratories.com

Hey, hey, it’s my good friend Charles! An awesome dude who doesn’t get anywhere the recognition that he should… Ooh, I remember from years ago when he ran the best Mars forum the interwebs have ever seen. Seriously, it was fanfreakintastic. Such good people. Such good memories. And not a drop of woo!

So glad to hear that the findings from all those years are getting a place of their own. I pray it catches on, especially with the young folks. It’d be just grand!

be well

 

far side

far side

We’ve seen the far side quite a few times – from orbit…

But…

These are the first ever images taken from the ground on the far side of the Moon.

Captured by the Chinese Lunar Exploration Project (CLEP)’s history-making Chang’e-4 spacecraft.

www.clep.org.cn…

This is simply FanFreakin’tastic!

Such wonderfuil things are coming!

be well

 

horse brains

Plate XXVII. Brain and ear. Descriptive anatomy of the horse and domestic animals. 1870.

the head

“Right infero-lateral view of the head.” Strangeways’ veterinary anatomy. 1879.

Via the one and only nemfrog

be well

 

 

Ion drive: The first flight

nature video
Published on Nov 21, 2018

Researchers from MIT have flown a plane without moving parts for the first time. It is powered by an ‘ion drive’ which uses high powered electrodes to ionise and accelerate air particles, creating an ‘ionic wind’. This wind drove a 5m wide craft across a sports hall. Unlike the ion drives which have powered space craft for decades, this new drive uses air as the accelerant. The researchers say it could power silent drones. Read the original research paper: doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-07… Read Nature’s Editorial which also raises possible concerns about how a silent drone might be used: doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-07…

Here is a snippet from a Scientific American.com article called Silent and Simple Ion Engine Powers a Plane with No Moving Parts. There is also an ATS discussion with the same title here.

Behind a thin white veil separating his makeshift lab from joggers at a Massachusetts Institute of Technology indoor track, aerospace engineer Steven Barrett recently test-flew the first-ever airplane powered with ionic wind thrusters—electric engines that generate momentum by creating and firing off charged particles.

Using this principle to fly an aircraft has long been, according even to Barrett, a “far-fetched idea” and the stuff of science fiction. But he still wanted to try. “In Star Trek you have shuttlecraft gliding silently past,” he says. “I thought, ‘We should have aircraft like that.’”

Thinking ionic wind propulsion could fit the bill, he spent eight years studying the technology and then decided to try building a prototype miniature aircraft—albeit one he thought was a little ugly. “It’s a kind of dirty yellow color,” he says, adding that black paint often contains carbon—which conducts electricity and caused a previous iteration to fry itself

Unlike its predecessors, which had tumbled to the ground, Version 2 sailed nearly 200 feet through the air at roughly 11 miles per hour (17 kilometers per hour). With no visible exhaust and no roaring jet or whirling propeller—no moving parts at all, in fact—the aircraft seemed silently animated by an ethereal source. “It was very exciting,” Barrett says. “Then it crashed into the wall, which wasn’t ideal.”

Barrett and his team figured out three main things to make Version 2 work. The first was the ionic wind thruster design. Version 2’s thrusters consist of two rows of long metal strands draped under its sky blue wings. The front row conducts some 40,000 volts of electricity—166 times the voltage delivered to the average house, and enough energy to strip the electrons off ample nitrogen atoms hanging in the atmosphere.

Another innovation Barrett’s team came up with was designing a lightweight but powerful electrical system, Walker notes. Before this aircraft, he says, nobody had created a system that could convert power from a lightweight battery efficiently enough to generate sufficient voltage for the thrusters.

Finally Barrett used a computer model to get the most out of every design element in the aircraft, from the thruster and electrical system designs to the wires that ran through the plane. “The power converter, the battery, the caps and fuselage—everything was optimized,” Barrett says. “The simulations failed all the time. We had to make hundreds of changes.” In the end, they had the triumphant Version 2.

The breakthrough offers a great proof of concept showing ion thrusters can be used on Earth….Propellers and jets are still far more efficient than the ion wind thrusters Barrett demonstrated, making it unlikely that passenger planes would switch over anytime soon. But the thrusters have one key advantage: “There’s no sound generation

Over at ATS, one of our resident aircraft experts, anzha, offered … “Bit more info:” www.eurekalert.org… www.nature.com… and www.nature.com…

If we can overcome our socio-survival obstacles and get ourselves to a good place the future is made nicer by this development. I would venture that although it does require lots and lots of volts, those volts will be forthcoming without too much difficulty. Note to self: gotta read all the articles!

be well

 

Ultima Thule

This image made available by NASA on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019 shows images with separate color and detail information, and a composited image of both, showing Ultima Thule, about 1 billion miles beyond Pluto. The New Horizons spacecraft encountered it on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019. (NASA via AP)

Read more at: NASA: Icy object past Pluto looks like reddish snowman

Ultima Thule

A new picture returned from Nasa’s New Horizons spacecraft shows the little world to be two objects joined together – to give a look like a “snowman.” The US probe’s images acquired as it approached Ultima hinted at the possibility of a double body, but the first detailed picture from Tuesday’s close flyby confirms it.
www.bbc.co.uk…

Ultima Thule

Ultima Thule… the most distant object that our current human civilization has ever checked out – at 4.1 billion miles out from Earth.

I think it’s lovely.

Read more at Phys.org’s NASA: Icy object past Pluto looks like reddish snowman.

Images by NASA via AP

Spectacular. Bravo dear Space Cowboys, we love you so!

be well

 

near-Earth asteroid 2003 SD220

These three radar images of near-Earth asteroid 2003 SD220 were obtained on Dec. 15-17, by coordinating observations with NASA’s 230-foot (70-meter) antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California and the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) 330-foot (100-meter) Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR/NSF/GBO

More here at JPL.

Looks like a thingy… : /

be well

 

This just in! Received from the boffins…

 

outofhere

NASA’s Voyager 2 Probe Enters Interstellar Space

For the second time in history, a human-made object has reached the space between the stars. NASA’s Voyager 2 probe now has exited the heliosphere – the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the Sun.

Members of NASA’s Voyager team will discuss the findings at a news conference at 11 a.m. EST (8 a.m. PST) today at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in Washington. The news conference will stream live on the agency’s website.

Comparing data from different instruments aboard the trailblazing spacecraft, mission scientists determined the probe crossed the outer edge of the heliosphere on Nov. 5. This boundary, called the heliopause, is where the tenuous, hot solar wind meets the cold, dense interstellar medium. Its twin, Voyager 1, crossed this boundary in 2012, but Voyager 2 carries a working instrument that will provide first-of-its-kind observations of the nature of this gateway into interstellar space.

Voyager 2 now is slightly more than 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from Earth. Mission operators still can communicate with Voyager 2 as it enters this new phase of its journey, but information – moving at the speed of light – takes about 16.5 hours to travel from the spacecraft to Earth. By comparison, light traveling from the Sun takes about eight minutes to reach Earth.

numbers

Artist’s concept of Voyager 2 with 9 facts listed around it. Image Credit: NASA
Larger view

The most compelling evidence of Voyager 2’s exit from the heliosphere came from its onboard Plasma Science Experiment (PLS), an instrument that stopped working on Voyager 1 in 1980, long before that probe crossed the heliopause. Until recently, the space surrounding Voyager 2 was filled predominantly with plasma flowing out from our Sun. This outflow, called the solar wind, creates a bubble – the heliosphere – that envelopes the planets in our solar system. The PLS uses the electrical current of the plasma to detect the speed, density, temperature, pressure and flux of the solar wind. The PLS aboard Voyager 2 observed a steep decline in the speed of the solar wind particles on Nov. 5. Since that date, the plasma instrument has observed no solar wind flow in the environment around Voyager 2, which makes mission scientists confident the probe has left the heliosphere.

readings

Animated gif showing the plasma data. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Larger view

“Working on Voyager makes me feel like an explorer, because everything we’re seeing is new,” said John Richardson, principal investigator for the PLS instrument and a principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “Even though Voyager 1 crossed the heliopause in 2012, it did so at a different place and a different time, and without the PLS data. So we’re still seeing things that no one has seen before.”

In addition to the plasma data, Voyager’s science team members have seen evidence from three other onboard instruments – the cosmic ray subsystem, the low energy charged particle instrument and the magnetometer – that is consistent with the conclusion that Voyager 2 has crossed the heliopause. Voyager’s team members are eager to continue to study the data from these other onboard instruments to get a clearer picture of the environment through which Voyager 2 is traveling.

“There is still a lot to learn about the region of interstellar space immediately beyond the heliopause,” said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist based at Caltech in Pasadena, California.

Together, the two Voyagers provide a detailed glimpse of how our heliosphere interacts with the constant interstellar wind flowing from beyond. Their observations complement data from NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), a mission that is remotely sensing that boundary. NASA also is preparing an additional mission – the upcoming Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP), due to launch in 2024 – to capitalize on the Voyagers’ observations.

“Voyager has a very special place for us in our heliophysics fleet,” said Nicola Fox, director of the Heliophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. “Our studies start at the Sun and extend out to everything the solar wind touches. To have the Voyagers sending back information about the edge of the Sun’s influence gives us an unprecedented glimpse of truly uncharted territory.”

While the probes have left the heliosphere, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 have not yet left the solar system, and won’t be leaving anytime soon. The boundary of the solar system is considered to be beyond the outer edge of the Oort Cloud, a collection of small objects that are still under the influence of the Sun’s gravity. The width of the Oort Cloud is not known precisely, but it is estimated to begin at about 1,000 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun and to extend to about 100,000 AU. One AU is the distance from the Sun to Earth. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 2 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly 30,000 years to fly beyond it.

The Voyager probes are powered using heat from the decay of radioactive material, contained in a device called a radioisotope thermal generator (RTG). The power output of the RTGs diminishes by about four watts per year, which means that various parts of the Voyagers, including the cameras on both spacecraft, have been turned off over time to manage power.

“I think we’re all happy and relieved that the Voyager probes have both operated long enough to make it past this milestone,” said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for. Now we’re looking forward to what we’ll be able to learn from having both probes outside the heliopause.”

Voyager 2 launched in 1977, 16 days before Voyager 1, and both have traveled well beyond their original destinations. The spacecraft were built to last five years and conduct close-up studies of Jupiter and Saturn. However, as the mission continued, additional flybys of the two outermost giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, proved possible. As the spacecraft flew across the solar system, remote-control reprogramming was used to endow the Voyagers with greater capabilities than they possessed when they left Earth. Their two-planet mission became a four-planet mission. Their five-year lifespans have stretched to 41 years, making Voyager 2 NASA’s longest running mission.

The Voyager story has impacted not only generations of current and future scientists and engineers, but also Earth’s culture, including film, art and music. Each spacecraft carries a Golden Record of Earth sounds, pictures and messages. Since the spacecraft could last billions of years, these circular time capsules could one day be the only traces of human civilization.

Voyager’s mission controllers communicate with the probes using NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN), a global system for communicating with interplanetary spacecraft. The DSN consists of three clusters of antennas inGoldstone, California; Madrid, Spain; and Canberra, Australia.

The Voyager Interstellar Mission is a part of NASA’s Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL built and operates the twin Voyager spacecraft. NASA’s DSN, managed by JPL, is an international network of antennas that supports interplanetary spacecraft missions and radio and radar astronomy observations for the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The network also supports selected Earth-orbiting missions. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science agency, operates both the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex, part of the DSN, and the Parkes Observatory, which NASA has been using to downlink data from Voyager 2 since Nov. 8.

For more information about the Voyager mission, visit:

www.nasa.gov/voyager

More information about NASA’s Heliophysics missions is available online at:

www.nasa.gov/sunearth

Hahaha, Vger has left the building! Now they’re both out there.

This is so cool, this is seriously exciting to me.

Now we’ll be able to clearly see the real makeup of space and be free of the noise of the heliosphere. There will be revelations and discoveries and wondrous new surprises. I have learned in my decades that the farther out you go, the weirder it gets.

Of this there is no doubt and for this we are grateful.

be well

 

Raw Sounds from InSight’s Seismometer on Mars

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2018

Listen to raw, unprocessed data from the seismometer on NASA’s InSight spacecraft of vibrations caused by wind moving over the solar panels on Mars. A subwoofer or earphones are needed to hear this clip. The sounds were recorded by two of the three short-period sensors on the seismometer (SEIS). The audio is available for download at NASA.gov/sounds. JPL manages InSight for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. InSight is part of NASA’s Discovery Program, managed by the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. France’s national space agency, Centre National d’Études Spatiales (CNES), Paris, leads the consortium that provided SEIS. The principal investigator for SEIS is Philippe Lognonné of the Institute of Earth Physics of Paris (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, or IPGP). Imperial College, London, and Oxford University made the short-period sensors.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/UKSA/Imperial College London/Oxford/ETH

For years I have anxiously awaited audio from Mars. And I am smitten… regardless of the fact that this is from a seismometer and not a microphone.

I seem to recall being told a good while back that there’s a mic on Curiosity, but I am not sure, now, as we’ve certainly not heard a peep from it if it exists.

The .wav files below are from Insight Mars Wind.

00:20

More Audible Sounds from InSight’s Seismometer on Mars

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2018

More Audible Sounds from InSight’s Seismometer on Mars Listen to data from the seismometer on NASA’s InSight spacecraft of vibrations caused by Martian wind moving over the lander’s solar panels. In this version, the data have been processed to raise the frequencies by two octaves to make them more audible. Both the processed and unprocessed audio are available for download at nasa.gov/sounds.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/UKSA/Imperial College London/Oxford/ETH

better bass:

00:20

Sounds from InSight’s Pressure Sensor on Mars

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2018

Listen to data from the air pressure sensor on NASA’s InSight lander, indicating wind blowing by on Mars. The data were sped up by a factor of 100, shortening the duration of the recording and shifting it up in frequency 100 times (a little more than six octaves).

For more information on the InSight mission, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/insight

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/Cornell

02:27

be well

 

WooHoo! It’s new and it’s a biggun!

newsirensal

newsirensal

What has two short, chunky arms, a mane of feathery gills, and a sleek, green-marbled, eel-like body as long as your leg? No guesses? Meet the reticulated siren, a massive, two and a half foot-long salamander, described for the first time in a paper published today in the journal PLOS ONE, hailing from the remote, secluded wilds of *checks notes* southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Sirens are a small family of unusual salamanders found throughout the Southeastern U.S. and parts of Mexico. They are entirely aquatic, living in swamps and ponds and keeping their bushy external gills through adulthood. Ranging from a few inches to over three feet long, sirens have shrimpy forelimbs, and have ditched their hindlimbs altogether, leaving only a long, eel-like body and tail fin. Their name comes from their mermaid-adjacent body plan and their occasional “singing” and croaking.

Knowledge of the reticulated siren didn’t just spring into being overnight. For decades, the salamander had an almost mythical status in herpetology circles.

Sean Graham, a biologist at Sul Ross State University, author of American Snakes, and lead author on the new study, first heard about the enigmatic “leopard eel” in the early 2000s. “It was almost a rumored thing, almost like a unicorn,” he recounted. “Some biologists were familiar with it and had seen it.”

Hearing those biologists’ stories and seeing the handful of preserved specimens that were collected years ago left an impression. “I thought ‘holy crap, this is a big siren species that’s really obviously different,’ boldly colored and crazy looking!” Graham said. About ten years ago, while in graduate school at Auburn University, he mentioned the siren’s possible existence to then-fellow student David Steen, now a research ecologist at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center and coauthor on the study.

“We wanted to describe this mysterious siren that others had noted as occurring in southern Alabama,” Steen said. “But we had no real claim to the project; we knew that if we wanted to work on this species we had to find one in the wild ourselves.”

Graham and Steen periodically visited the salamander’s purported turf, but came back empty handed every time. Then, in 2009, Steen captured one in the Florida Panhandle.

Read the rest and find out how they did it…
Nearly Mythical 3-Foot-Long Swamp Salamander Is Officially a Real Species

I have loved salamanders ever since I started exploring the woods… well before my 10th. They’re just neat.

I dig this newly categorized Siren reticulata fellow. Nifty keen! And nice and big… a meter is big, eh?

be well

 

shinyrok

rhinyshok

shinyrok

rinyshok

shinyrok

The Mars Rover has found a strange shiny object on the Mars Surface.

image credits: NASA / JPL / CalTech

NASA think they may have an idea what it could be, but they are prepared to be surprised.

Nasa has spotted a strange, shiny object lying on the Martian surface. The planet is largely red, dusty and bland, meaning that anything unusual stands out.

The latest discovery is one such object: a shiny lump that is visible on the surface. Now the team behind the Curiosity rover intends to have a proper look at the object, in the hope of finding out what it is.

Though they have their suspicions, they are ready to be surprised.

www.independent.co.uk…

They are actually going to drive over there and check it out. That’s yuge.

They’ve already shot it thrice with a laser for chemical analysis. Currently the main thought is meteorite, but the lab’s still hummin,’ so who knows, eh.

This is a nice thing.

Especially the level of interest. Seems this has been trending in a positive direction for a while now and trust me, it is a great sign (and omen, even) for the future.

be well

 

andrewsarchus

Andrewsarchus

weird lookin’ critter!

Andrewsarchus—the World’s Largest Predatory Mammal

by Bob Strauss
Updated September 25, 2018

Andrewsarchus is one of the world’s most tantalizing prehistoric animals: its three-foot-long, toothstudded skull indicates that it was a giant predator, but the fact is that we have no idea what the rest of this mammal’s body looked like.

Andrewsarchus Is Known by a Single Skull

as

All we know about Andrewsarchus amounts to a single, three-foot-long, vaguely wolf-shaped skull, discovered in Mongolia in 1923. While the skull clearly belongs to some type of mammal—there are obvious diagnostic markers by which paleontologists can distinguish between reptilian and mammalian bones—the lack of an accompanying skeleton has resulted in nearly a century of confusion, and debate, about what type of animal Andrewsarchus really was.

Andrewsarchus is one of the world’s most tantalizing prehistoric animals: its three-foot-long, toothstudded skull indicates that it was a giant predator, but the fact is that we have no idea what the rest of this mammal’s body looked like.

All we know about Andrewsarchus amounts to a single, three-foot-long, vaguely wolf-shaped skull, discovered in Mongolia in 1923. While the skull clearly belongs to some type of mammal—there are obvious diagnostic markers by which paleontologists can distinguish between reptilian and mammalian bones—the lack of an accompanying skeleton has resulted in nearly a century of confusion, and debate, about what type of animal Andrewsarchus really was.

The Fossil of Andrewsarchus Was Discovered by Roy Chapman Andrews (My Hero!)

rca

During the 1920’s, the swashbuckling paleontologist Roy Chapman Andrews, sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History in New York, embarked on a series of well-publicized fossil-hunting expeditions to central Asia (then, as it still is now, one of the most remote regions on earth). After its discovery, Andrewsarchus (“Andrews’ ruler”) was named in his honor, though it’s unclear whether Andrews bestowed this name himself or left the task to other members of his team.

Wonderful, wonderful!

be well

 

deer eating a bird

Linda Loo
Published on May 16, 2010

Birds were flying in and running into the head of this young buck in our front yard. I was watching through the window, and I didn’t know why the birds were attacking him. Then, I saw the little bird on the ground. The other birds had only been trying to distract the deer. I decided not to exchange the audio with music because when I played the video back, I realized my overly dramatic reaction was funny. Yes, I know I have a country accent. Please be kind in your comments! I own the rights to this video. RIP Michael, my amazing husband. I miss your laugh! 12/06/60 – 08/10/18

Got the link to this from Dr. Karl Shuker’s blog… I mean, how could I have resisted clicking on ‘Bird-eating Deer’? Seriously.

And there it was! I’ve never heard of this behavior before, but obviously if this one did it, then I’m sure millions of others have, too. Gosh, do adult deer also eat birds? Or, omg, babies?!

Yikes!

be well

 

Progress launch timelapse seen from space

European Space Agency, ESA
Published on Nov 22, 2018

Timelapse of the Russian Progress MS-10 cargo spacecraft launched on 16 November 2018 at
18:14 GMT from Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst from the International Space Station. The spacecraft was launched atop a Soyuz rocket with 2564 kg of cargo and supplies. Flying at 28 800 km/h, 400 km high, the International Space Station requires regular supplies from Earth such as this Progress launch. Spacecraft are launched after the Space Station flies overhead so they catch up with the orbital outpost to dock, in this case two days later on 18 November 2018. The images were taken from the European-built Cupola module with a camera set to take pictures at regular intervals. The pictures are then played quickly after each other at 8 to 16 times normal speed. The video shows around 15 minutes of the launch at normal speed. The Progress spacecraft delivered food, fuel and supplies, including about 750 kg of propellant, 75 kg of oxygen and air and 440 l of water.

Some notable moments in this video are:
00:07 Soyuz-FG rocket booster separation.

00:19 Core stage separation.

00:34:05 Core stage starts burning in the atmosphere as it returns to Earth after having spent all its fuel.

00:34:19 Progress spacecraft separates from rocket and enters orbit to catch up with the International Space Station.

Download the video: bit.ly/ProgressLaunchTimelapse…

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related. Copyright information about our videos is available here: www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Term…

My eyes have difficulties nowadays with this sort of thing, but it looks spectacular, just the same!

be well