Paleontology

A large pterosaur femur from the Kimmeridgian, Upper Jurassic of Lusitanian Basin, Portugal. Art by Joschua Knüppe

r/Pterosaurs – Posted by u/Saurophaganax_linkage

 

 

Mystery Flesh Pit National Park – 2007 Disaster Report

The Exploring Series
Oct 8, 2021

mysteryfleshpit.tumblr.com/

Is the Mystery Flesh Pit real or fake? People have questions about the Texas National Park “attraction” after its creator tweeted about a long-awaited update.

What is the Mystery Flesh Pit?

The Mystery Flesh Pit is the name given to a “bizarre natural geobiological feature discovered in the Permian basin region of West Texas in the early 1970s.”

That’s in the words of the creator, Trevor Roberts. The illustrator goes on to describe the national park’s fleshy central feature, which has posters and brochures.

  • EXPLORED: Who is New York Jets star Carl Lawson’s girlfriend?

He says in a chat with Tor: “The pit is characterized as an enormous subterranean organism of indeterminate size and origin embedded deep within the earth, displaying a vast array of highly unusual and often disturbing phenomena within its vast internal anatomy.”

In other words, it is a pit whose walls are made of a flesh-like substance, and which goes deep into the earth.

Is the Mystery Flesh Pit real or fake?

As mentioned, it’s a creation by artist Trevor Roberts. Thankfully.

It’s what’s called a worldbuilding project. Worldbuilding is the process of constructing a fictional universe so, despite the official-looking brochures, it is definitely something that a creative cooked up in his head.

Most of the lore can be found on either the official Subreddit or on Tumblr, with videos being hosted on a related YouTube channel.

 

LOL

Check it all out in all it’s glory at:

Gosh, good fun.

 

Nice!

The Cambrian was such an amazing time in our planet’s history. Chock full of new animals and some of them were quite strange. Always fascinating. This guy really opens up a new view of life back then. And I am sure there are more to come… as long as they keep digging.

‘Massive’ new animal species discovered in half-billion-year-old Burgess Shale

dug88
member
Registered: 12/15/2010
Location:
Mood:

posted on Sep, 8 2021 @ 08:44 PM
direct link to this post

A bit of a clickbaity title, but still a pretty neat discovery out of the Burgess Shale Deposit, a 500 million year old cambrian era shale deposit well known for fossils located in the Rocky Mountains in Yoho and Kootenay national parks in British Columbia.

A, relatively, massive new species of animal is the largest discovered from that time period. It’s estimated to be about 0.5 meters(18″) total in length in a time where most life was only a few inches in size.

and i gotta say this description

Titanokorys had multifaceted eyes, a pineapple slice-shaped, tooth-lined mouth, a pair of spiny claws below its head to capture prey and a body with a series of flaps for swimming.

Those poor finger sized little animals. That thing would be like a T-Rex coming at you.

www.rom.on.ca…

Palaeontologists at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered the remains of a huge new fossil species belonging to an extinct animal group in half-a-billion-year-old Cambrian rocks from Kootenay National Park in the Canadian Rockies. The findings were announced on September 8, 2021, in a study published in Royal Society Open Science.

Named Titanokorys gainesi, this new species is remarkable for its size. With an estimated total length of half a meter, Titanokorys was a giant compared to most animals that lived in the seas at that time, most of which barely reached the size of a pinky finger.

“The sheer size of this animal is absolutely mind-boggling, this is one of the biggest animals from the Cambrian period ever found,” says Jean-Bernard Caron, ROM’s Richard M. Ivey Curator of Invertebrate Palaeontology.

Evolutionarily speaking, Titanokorys belongs to a group of primitive arthropods called radiodonts. The most iconic representative of this group is the streamlined predator Anomalocaris, which may itself have approached a metre in length. Like all radiodonts, Titanokorys had multifaceted eyes, a pineapple slice-shaped, tooth-lined mouth, a pair of spiny claws below its head to capture prey and a body with a series of flaps for swimming. Within this group, some species also possessed large, conspicuous head carapaces, with Titanokorys being one of the largest ever known.

“Titanokorys is part of a subgroup of radiodonts, called hurdiids, characterized by an incredibly long head covered by a three-part carapace that took on myriad shapes. The head is so long relative to the body that these animals are really little more than swimming heads

All fossils in this study were collected around Marble Canyon in northern Kootenay National Park by successive ROM expeditions. Discovered less than a decade ago, this area has yielded a great variety of Burgess Shale animals dating back to the Cambrian period, including a smaller, more abundant relative of Titanokorys named Cambroraster falcatus in reference to its Millennium Falcon-shaped head carapace. According to the authors, the two species might have competed for similar bottom-dwelling prey.

The Burgess Shale fossil sites are located within Yoho and Kootenay National Parks and are managed by Parks Canada.

This lifted my profound depression a good bit today and I am well pleased that the research continues.

 

A most interesting discovery.

Ancient DNA from a teen girl reveals previously unknown group of humans

By Ashley Strickland, CNN
linkage
Updated 11:17 AM ET, Wed August 25, 2021

The skeletal remains of an ancient teenage Toalean woman were nestled among large rocks, which were placed in the burial pit discovered in a cave on Sulawesi.

(CNN)The bones of a teenage hunter-gatherer who died more than 7,000 years ago on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi tell the story of a previously unknown group of humans.

This distinct human lineage has never been found anywhere else in the world, according to new research.

The study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

“We have discovered the first ancient human DNA in the island region between Asia and Australia, known as ‘Wallacea’, providing new insight into the genetic diversity and population history of early modern humans in this little understood part of the world,” said study coauthor Adam Brumm, a professor of archaeology at Griffith University’s Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution, via email.

The Leang Panninge cave is where researchers uncovered the remains a young hunter-gatherer from 7,000 years ago.

The first modern humans used the Wallacea islands, mainly Indonesian islands that include Sulawesi, Lombok and Flores, as they crossed from Eurasia to the Australian continent more than 50,000 years ago, researchers believe. The exact route or how they navigated this crossing, however, is unknown.

In South Sulawesi, Indonesia, find some of the world’s oldest cave art

“They must have done so using relatively sophisticated watercraft of some kind, as there were no land bridges between the islands, even during the glacial peaks of the last ice age, when global sea levels were up to 140 meters (459 feet) lower than they are today,” Brumm said.

Tools and cave paintings have suggested that humans were living on these islands by 47,000 years ago, but the fossil record is sparse and ancient DNA degrades more rapidly in the tropical climate.

However, researchers uncovered the skeleton of a female between the ages of 17 and 18 in a cave on Sulawesi in 2015. Her remains were buried in the cave 7,200 years ago. She was part of the Toalean culture, only found in a pocket of Sulawesi’s southwestern peninsula. The cave is part of an archaeological site called Leang Panninge.

Maros points are associated with the Toalean culture.

“The ‘Toaleans’ is the name archaeologists have given to a rather enigmatic culture of prehistoric hunter-gatherers that lived in the forested plains and mountains of South Sulawesi between around 8,000 years ago until roughly the fifth century AD,” said Brumm via email. “They made highly distinctive stone tools (including tiny, finely crafted arrowheads known as ‘Maros points’) that are not found anywhere else on the island or in wider Indonesia.”

The young hunter-gatherer is the first largely complete and well-preserved skeleton associated with the Toalean culture, Brumm said.

Lead study author Selina Carlhoff was able to retrieve DNA from the wedge-shaped petrous bone at the base of the skull.

“It was a major challenge, as the remains had been strongly degraded by the tropical climate,” said Carlhoff, also a doctoral candidate at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, in a statement.

Secrets hiding in DNA

The work to retrieve the genetic information was well worth it.

The young woman’s DNA showed that she descended from the first wave of modern humans to enter Wallacea 50,000 years ago. This was part of the initial colonization of “Greater Australia,” or the combined ice age landmass of Australia and New Guinea. These are the ancestors of present-day Indigenous Australians and Papuans, Brumm said.

Fragmentary remains of the girl’s skull were used to retrieve her DNA.

And it turns out that the oldest genome traced to the Wallacea islands revealed something else: previously unknown ancient humans.

She also shares ancestry with a separate and distinct group from Asia who likely arrived after the colonization of Greater Australia — because modern Indigenous Australians and Papuans don’t share ancestry with this group, Brumm said.

“Previously, it was thought that the first time people with Asian genes entered Wallacea was around 3,500 years ago when Austronesian-speaking farmers from Neolithic Taiwan swept down through the Philippines and into Indonesia,” he said.

“It suggests that there might have been a distinct group of modern humans in this region that we really had no idea about up until now, as archaeological sites are so scarce in Wallacea and ancient skeletal remains are rare.”

New clue to human evolution’s biggest mystery emerges in Philippines

No descendents of this lineage remain.

Her genome included another trace of an enigmatic and extinct group of humans: Denisovans. The handful of fossils signifying that these early humans ever existed are largely from Siberia and Tibet.

“The fact that their genes are found in the hunter-gatherers of Leang Panninge supports our earlier hypothesis that the Denisovans occupied a far larger geographical area” than previously understood, said study coauthor Johannes Krause, a professor of archaeogenetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, in a statement.

But when her DNA was compared with that of other hunter-gatherers who lived west of Wallacea at the same time, their DNA didn’t contain any traces of Denisovan DNA.

“The geographic distribution of Denisovans and modern humans may have overlapped in the Wallacea region. It may well be the key place where Denisova people and the ancestors of indigenous Australians and Papuans interbred,” said study coauthor Cosimo Posth, a professor at the University of Tübingen’s Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment in Frankfurt, Germany, in a statement.

Researchers don’t know what happened to the Toalean culture, and this latest discovery is one piece of the puzzle as they try to understand the ancient genetic history of humans in southeast Asia. Brumm hopes that more ancient DNA from the Toalean people can be recovered to reveal its diversity “and its wider ancestral story.”

Pretty cool, no?

 

GIANT SERPENTS OF THE BLACK SEA

Paranormal Research Paul Stonehill
Jan 24, 2021

…The dragon let out loud, chilling screams, like the trumpet calls of an angry elephant……saw in the water a dark gray creature over 20 meters long, which, making undulating movements, was moving in the direction…

Nifty keen, cryptid fans! =]

 

Posted by u/KimCureAll
linkage

Hallucigenia is aptly named: With long spines down its back, seven pairs of clawed legs, and six tentacles gracing its neck, the 500 million year old ocean-floor denizen was an ancient relative of the velvet worm. Hallucigenia is a very early member of Ecdysozoa whose members all shed their cuticle.

One of my favorite animals!

 

Posted by u/White_Wolf_77
linkage

‘Mother of Vipers’ by Hodari Nundu.

“A large viper Laophis crotaloides protects its young from several monkeys, agitated by its resurgence after spending the winter months in an underground torpor. Laophis lived in the Pliocene in what is today Greece. It is the largest viper known until now from the fossil record with a length estimated at 3-4 m and weighing nearly 30 kg. Imagine the venom yield on this baby, and the size of prey it may have swallowed! Its relations are uncertain, with some believing it was related to Macrovipera, while others believe it was closer to the African Bitis (such as the Gaboon and rhinoceros vipers and the puff adder). Either way it would’ve been a formidable predator of its time. Some vipers are actually known to guard their young for a while after birth, usually until they first shed skin, and may fast during all that time.”

— Hodari Nundu

 

Posted by u/KimCureAll
linkage

A new fossil species of horseshoe crab was recently discovered and it was named after David Attenborough (Attenborolimulus superspinosus). There are only four known species of horseshoe crabs alive today, but the fossil record shows that hundreds of millions of years ago they were many more species.

Attenborolimulus superspinosus is one of more than 12 animals named after Sir David Attenborough, who has dedicated his life to helping us appreciate the beauty and vitality of the natural world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cambrian Explosion of life around 500 million years ago was a most fabulous part of Earth’s history.

 

Wow!

FOSSILS

Paraceratherium, the largest land mammal that ever lived

almost 6 years ago by Nick Garland

NICK GARLAND, Founder and Editor
LUCAS LIMA, Staff Artist

What’s weirder than a hornless rhinoceros? A hornless rhinoceros that was the largest land mammal that ever lived.

If one looks at the history of fossil mammals, it’s difficult to get much more strange than Paraceratherium, which holds the record for largest land mammal ever to have lived. This hornless rhinoceros relative lived during the Oligocene Epoch, some 34-23 million years ago and is estimated to have been around 25 feet long and weighed as much as 5 elephants. It was a member of a group of mammals called the Indricotheres, the hornless rhinoceroses.

You might be asking yourself, “How could a rhinoceros not have a horn?” Now, that’s a good question. The living rhinoceroses acquired their characteristic accoutrements relatively recently and there was a whole big group of rhinoceros relatives that didn’t have horns. Paraceratherium sure made up for that in sheer size, though. And it had a prehensile lip even bigger than modern rhinos that allowed it to browse for leaves on trees in their native range from the Balkans to China and Pakistan.

read the rest of it, eh?

This is just too cool. What other amazing things are waiting to be unearthed?

 

Charles W. Shults III

4m

Another interesting “rock”. Sol 1539, what appears to be a crinoid segment. Opportunity rover.

My buddy Charles rocks Mars research!

 

Stare obrazki ze zwierzętami

February 7, 2019

Pterodaktyl ze schwytanym ichtiozaurem / Le Ptérodactyle et l’ichthyosaure / (Berthoud 1866)

Great work!

Props to Dr. Karl Shuker!

 

Stare obrazki ze zwierzętami

July 14, 2015

Pterozaury / Flatterechse, Nyctodactylus gracilis / (Bölsche 1902)

Sweet!

Props to Dr. Karl Shuker!

 

The Remains of an Strange Creature Found On The Ocean Floor. Can You Identify This Mystery Animal?

Deborah Hatswell #BBR
Apr 29, 2021

Now on Twitter – Daily Sighting Reports, articles, videos and podcasts on your fav subjects. Bigfoot/Dogman/UFO/Supernatural/Unexplained. twitter.com/BbrDeborah #BBR debhatswell.wordpress.com/202…

Did a diver film a rare sea monster or the legendary Water Dragon at a depth of 835.5 meters

This video is exclusive to BBR Investigations. Feel free to share.

I was contacted by a gentleman who works with Remote Operated Vehicle equipment for the gas and oil industry. This video was captured in 2017 in the Mediterranean during an investigation of the sea bed. The ROV picked up a strange set of bones on the sea bed. The bones seem to be that of a sea serpent or unknown creature.

Sadly due to covid restrictions it has taken until now for myself and the chap to get together and discuss this unusual video capture.

Now I must stress this video was taken by professionals who work underwater in oceans all across the globe. They know Whale bones and come across them from time to time. The dimensions of the skeleton on the video does not fit with the usual size for any sea life in the area. A whale has three blades on it’s spinal bones each spaced 120 degrees apart and this creature seems to have only two.

The Mediterranean sea does join the Atlantic ocean so this creature could have come here from that ocean?

The gentleman who contacted me stated “The bones could be very ancient because I have seen many clay amphora sticking out of the mud and they have been there for potentially 1000’s of years. The bones were about 30 meters long and very large and look more like they belong to a serpent of some kind”

Now you can see the video footage for yourselves. What do you think this creature could be?

debhatswell.wordpress.com/202…

A fascinating report from my friend Deb Hatswell. She’s good people.

This specimen has some rather interesting features. I quite like the head. Must have been a slender beast. I don’t see anyplace where flippers would attach, so it must had fins or nothing,e like a snake. And 98 feet long!

I hope someone can sort it out one way or another.

Good to see a nice sea creature… very refreshing.

 

Perseverance Rover’s Mastcam-Z Captures Ingenuity’s Third Flight

jplNASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Apr 25, 2021

NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter takes off and lands in this video captured on April 25, 2021, by Mastcam-Z, an imager aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover. As expected, the helicopter flew out of its field of vision while completing a flight plan that took it 164 feet (50 meters) downrange of the landing spot. Keep watching, the helicopter will return to stick the landing. Top speed for today’s flight was about 2 meters per second, or about 4.5 miles-per-hour.

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was built by JPL, which also manages this technology demonstration project for NASA Headquarters. It is supported by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, and Space Technology Mission Directorate. NASA’s Ames Research Center and Langley Research Center provided significant flight performance analysis and technical assistance during Ingenuity’s development.

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust). Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis. The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet. JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance: -mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/ -nasa.gov/perseverance
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

k

 

Agate fossil coral reveals small flowers

r/NatureIsFuckingLit

Posted by
u/mohiemen

5 hours ago

🔥 Agate fossil coral reveals small flowers

Wonderful!

 

Majungasaurus crenatissimus

Majungasaurus crenatissimus, a horny, hungry, pissed-off squealing hog of a theropod. I like to assign a little personality to the animals I draw, and this species is just… the worst. Shameless, opportunistic, devoid of hygiene and pungent. If “fuck off” were an odour, these meat-pigs would emit it. They really give you every reason in the world to keep your distance. Best to take the hint.

saurophaganax reblogged ridiculouslyphotogenicsinosaurus’ post.

LOL, horny dinosaurs!

 

tuatara

r/NatureIsFuckingLit. It sure is.

Posted by u/RedRayRoosevelt, about 8 hours ago.

🔥 The Tuatara is believed to be able to live up to 100 years. They have a third eye and they aren’t technically lizards. Also they’ve been around since the Triassic…

Sweet!

 

Purussaurus

A massive beast fresh from r/interestingasfuck

Posted by u/HattoriHanzo9834 hours ago

Purussaurus is one of the largest known of the giant crocodilians, perhaps even surpassing Sarcosuchus in size. It reigned supreme in central South America in the Miocene period, 8 million years ago.

Holy Jesus, that thing is HUGE!

 

A Freakishly Well-Preserved Woolly Rhino

A Freakishly Well-Preserved Woolly Rhino Was Plucked From Siberia’s Melting Tundra

gortex
Knight of Ni Member
Registered: 8/16/2009 – Location: Valles Marineris – Mood: Transmogrified – Member was on ATS 12 minutes ago

posted on Jan, 2 2021 @ 04:11 PM

direct link to this post

As the planet warms Siberia’s melting tundra begins to give up its secrets from the past , who said climate change was all bed.
The most recent find from the region of the Russian Republic of Yakutia is this well preserved Woolly Rhino believed to be 2-3 years old which died around 20,000 and 50,000 years ago probably from drowning.

Preserved in ice for tens of thousands of years, this juvenile woolly rhino still has its thick, reddish-brown hair, all of its limbs, and most of its internal organs, including its intestines.

To date, this furry little creature is the best-preserved woolly rhino found in the Arctic Yakutia and may even be the most intact ever discovered anywhere in the world.
www.sciencealert.com…

Woolly rhino found in Yakutia in August 2020

The Siberian Times
Dec 29, 2020

courtesy Vitalik Isaev read more siberiantimes.com/other/other…

Little fella needs a name , I’m calling him Big Ron.

life is postponed for the future
one is educated to live in the future and not to live in today….Live in the present.

Wow. Seriously cool.

I hope that unknown animals will come to light!

 

macrocollum

A group of Macrocollum, a sauropodomorph from Triassic Brazil, expressing their fear for the unknown…

Source: stavrosskundromichalis

#macrocollum #sauropodomorpha #dinosaurs #art

Mmm dinosaur!

 

praying mantis hymenaea protera trapped in amber 12myo

Here we have a rather unfortunate praying mantis (Hymenaea protera) which got itself trapped in amber around 12 million years ago.

 

Troodon-Georgia Raptor

The wonderful Troodon, otherwise known as the Georgia Raptor.

I love raptors. I want to be one when I grow up.

 

models of Compsognathus © Dr Karl ShukerLife-sized models of Compsognathus (© Dr Karl Shuker)

Life-sized Compsognathus models, in a photo by Dr Karl Shuker, from his blog post, entitled FROM MINI-REX TO MOON COW – UNRAVELLING THE RIDDLE OF AMERICA’S MODERN-DAY ‘RIVER DINOSAURS’ where they are shown to be somewhat similar to the current bipedal mini-rexes of Colorado and Wyoming.

colorado mini t rex

I was so, so deeply into this twenty years ago when it first appeared on the interwebz. There was an excellent site, run by an eyewitness, wherein the photos of the critters taken by the friend* were posted and the encounters described, but it has been lost to history for many years now.

  • Read Karl’s article above for all the details. Nobody gets down to the heart of a story like Karl.

Colorado river blur, baby! Ooh, that blur is so Fortean, don’tcha know. This is one of the friend’s pics, by the way.

mystery
 
mystery

I would love to just stake out different places in the most likely areas for a couple or three weeks each till my gear recorded something good. Naturally, I do not think for a second that this scenario could ever exist in my reality. Sigh.

 

terror bird

Now, that’s what I’m talkin’ about!

From Mysterious Island (1961) – Photo Gallery – IMDb

The wizardry of Mr. Ray Harryhausen!

 

 

Phorusrhacos attack | Cesta do pravěku

Pteroplax
May 9, 2018

Nearing the end of the Tertiary expanse our protagonist comes face-to-face with a gigantic predatory bird. Footage is from Karel Zeman’s ‘Cesta do pravěku’ (1955), also known as ‘Journey to the Beginning of Time’. Zeman took much inspiration from the amazing artwork by his fellow countryman Zdeněk Burian, it’s perhaps more apparent here than in any other scene: paleoworld.ucoz.ru/_ph/3/11233… Apologies for the strange subtitle placement, I don’t know why it’s like that or how to correct it.

I love terror birds.

Quite a few gauchos will tell you that they’re still around!

 

 
Aldabra white-throated rail bird

An extinct bird just ‘evolved itself’ back into existence

The Aldabra hasn’t existed in almost 100,000 years. Now it’s back

By Thomas Shambler
18 May 2020

The Aldabra white-throated rail bird was declared extinct, a victim of rising sea levels almost 100,000 years ago.

However, the flightless brown bird has recently been spotted – leaving scientists scratching their heads as to how – and why – the species has come back to life.

According to research in the Zoological Journal of Linnean Society, the re-incarnated Aldabra bird is a product of ‘iterative evolution’. That’s when old genes thought to have died out re-emerge at a different point in time.

That means that while a bird’s ancestors might have disappeared, that DNA still remains – and provided the environment is right, there’s nothing to stop those ancient genes from replicating in modern times.

So identical species can indeed produce multiple, slightly evolved offshoots, throughout the course of their species’ history.

But don’t get your hopes up that this means dinosaurs and wooly mammoths will be popping up next. This scientific phenomenon only occurs within species that are nearly identical to their ancestors.

While iterative evolution has previously occurred in species such as turtles, it has never been seen in the realm of birds.

“We know of no other example in the rails, or of birds in general, that demonstrates this phenomenon so evidently,” said paleobiologist David Martill, in a statement.

“Only on the Aldabra, which has the oldest paleontological record of any oceanic island within the Indian Ocean region, is fossil evidence available that demonstrates the effects of changing sea levels on extinction and recolonization events.”

2020 was already an interesting and confusing year. Looks like now we have to contend with re-materializing birds, as well.

Source

This is fascinating. And rather exciting, too. At least, to me it is. I have always loved this sort of thing; and the more exotic and rare the occurrence, the more I like it. Because discovery and new knowledge is what it’s all about. accompanied always by renewed wisdom, of course.

 

 
ankylosaur

A lovely ankylosaur visits us from the Cretaceous…

Work in progress on underpainting for Zuul crurivastator. Be sure to practice your social distancing, or I cannot vouch for the safety of your shins.

thecoffeeisblack

 

 
Monoclonius

Cool hat guy 2: now in technicolor!!!!!

(Posed off Zdenêk Burian’s famous Monoclonius painting, color scheme inspired by Psittacosaurus and an old Triceratops toy I had)

Source: harmalite

This dude does great work.

I adore diner sores.

 

 

elephant bird

An artist’s impression of an extinct elephant bird. A new study has identified a member of one genus of the birds as the largest that ever lived.

— Jaime Chirinos / Zoological Society of London

10 feet tall. 1,000 pounds.

And exceptionally hungry.

 

 

new pterosaur in lebanon

Lebanonical mappage

New Pterosaur Species Unearthed in Lebanon

www.sci-news.com/paleontology/mimodactylus-libanensis-07872.html

Here via the appearance on my tumblr feed of the wonderful allosuchus’ reblogging of alphynix’s post.

Source: scinewscom

Ooh, I just love this… whenever new pieces of the puzzle are found I get a thrill.

You simply must know that there were at least as many species of all forms of life around back then as there are now… and due to the conditions present in those days potentially a lot more than exist today … the scarcity is simply because fossilization is not a common occurrence. Not in the least.

 

 

Yet more for Tomozaurus

Yet more for Tomozaurus

by Rodrigo-Vega

Published: February 24, 2009

Visual Art Original Work Traditional
© 2009 – 2019 Rodrigo-Vega

Let’s see…

G) Nguma-Monene: “Megaloserpens”?

H) Ropen: “Daemonterix”?? something like that?

I) Buru: …

Just Fabulous!

 

 

Cryptids and Monsters: Multiple T-Rex sightings in Texas???

williamdefalco
Oct 29, 2019

Help support my channel! www.patreon.com/williamdefalco (for exclusive posts and lots of photos) www.amazon.com/shop/williamde…
Here’s the link to my Burronjor video: youtu.be/ijlAi80Iv_Q
Here’s the link to my Partridge Creek Monster video: youtu.be/d0AafFlZG9U
Here’s the link to my Murray video: youtu.be/H8GwCa2DFhM
Here’s the link to my Stoa video: youtu.be/MfS4KOgGEoo
Here’s the link to the article: mysteriousuniverse.org/2019/1…

Cryptids and Monsters: Burrunjor, the last living T-Rex

williamdefalco
Oct 20, 2013

Cryptids and Monsters: The Partridge Creek Monster

williamdefalco
Sep 25, 2014

Cryptids and Monsters: The Murray

williamdefalco
Jul 29, 2016

Here’s the link to one of my favorite videos, the Burrunjor: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijlAi…

Cryptids and Monsters: Stoa

williamdefalco
Apr 18, 2019

Well, like the videomaker, this class of cryptid reports is far and away my favorite.

I had not heard much from Texas as opposed to Colorado and Wyoming, but, that is really down to my physical and mental conditions causing a whole lot of nothing to take place. The creator is not up on the latest in dinosaur knowledge and he keeps calling them T-Rex, which is kind of annoying, as they are obviously not.

Truth be told, the majority of dinosaurs of all types were small, like most of the subjects of these videos, 2 or 3 feet tall.

Let us forgive him his sins and just enjoy the wonderful collection of stories he has compiled along with some very fine research into these critters, quite a few of which are new to me.

Some good stuff here, folks and Gol dang it, if I had the ability I would be down there with a tonne of recording devices for as long as it took to get some fine stuff.

Highly recommended!

 

 

Koolasuchus – The Antarctic Amphibian That Ate Dinosaurs

Ben G Thomas
Sep 29, 2019

Prehistoric Australia was home to all sorts of strange creatures, including a giant carnivorous amphibian that may have fed on dinosaurs – Koolasuchus.

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Sources: www.researchgate.net/publicat… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koolasu… scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzool… museumsvictoria.com.au/websit… museumsvictoria.com.au/websit… www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/s… web.archive.org/web/200802200…

Now, that’s one hell of a salamander, alright!

 

 

When Whales Ate Sloths

Ben G Thomas
Jun 16, 2019

At one point in the evolution of whales, certain prehistoric Sperm Whales became macroraptorials – hunting down all sorts of large prey including marine sloths. Nature’s Compendium YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCLoa… Instagram: www.instagram.com/naturescomp… Join our Discord server: discord.gg/3KgpG8J Subscribe to our subreddit: www.reddit.com/r/BenGThomas

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Sources: web.archive.org/web/201807222… web.archive.org/web/201807222… www.eartharchives.org/articles… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acrophy… fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=ta… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrora… academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/a… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brygmop… en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zygophy… academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/a…

Gosh.

I think that, for us, it is a fine thing that the whales grew themselves out of this phase. That is way too many massive teeth aimed at biting your body.

 

 

yi qi

The Yi Qi

Art by Emily A. Willoughby

Yi qi – May 2015

Medium: Gouache & digital composite
Time taken: 20 hours
Published in: Wikipedia
High resolution: Purchase print

2-day gouache painting of Yi qi, the bizarre new membrane-winged scansoriopterygid. I wanted to see what the membrane would look like attaching further down on the body than in nearly every depiction I’ve seen so far, which show it attaching on the flank or at the armpit. I can’t get behind a leg-attachment point for this critter; it makes more sense to me that a long-legged animal would want its legs free and flexible. If a sprawling mobile hip-joint can be established for scansors, I’d potentially change my stance on that. Anyway, here’s a semi-new interpretation amidst a flood of recent restorations.

I’m definitely not convinced of powered flight for this critter, so here it is in an extended leap onto a log in pursuit of a Tiaojishan archisargid fly, Calosarugus.

Awesome! Loving it. =D

 

 

Quetzalcoatlus Northropi

Quetzalcoatlus Northropi

This creature could do a number on your head, eh?! Thatd mess up your day. It’s… so huge!

I love pterosaurs! I want to see one so bad, but I have lost the means to go where they hang out. Sigh.

 

 

Here are some nasty great bigguns you probably wouldn’t want to encounter.

#10 Epicyon Haydeni
Epicyon Haydeni

#9 Dinocrocuta Gigantea
Dinocrocuta Gigantea

#8 Natodomeri Lion
Natodomeri Lion

#7 Smilodon populator (Saber tooth Tiger)
Smilodon populator Saber tooth Tiger

#6 Mongolonyx Robustus
Mongolonyx Robustus

#5 Amphicyon Ingens
Amphicyon Ingens

#4 Megistotherium Osteothlastes
Megistotherium Osteothlastes

3# Entelodont (Hell Pig)
Entelodont Hell Pig

#2 Simbakubwa Kutokaafrica
Simbakubwa Kutokaafrica

1# Andrewsarchus Mongoliensis
Andrewsarchus Mongoliensis

Unless, of course, you are into being someone’s meal for the night.

 

 

Titanis walleri copyr Karl Shuker

Titanis walleri _ photo by Dr. Karl Shuker

The last of the Terror Birds. My favorite birds!

Carnivorous.

Hungry.

Yuge.

If you’re 6 feet you’ll be looking into the middle of its chest. o.O

If you’re lucky.

 

 

A Field Guide to Shells and Lifeforms on Mars, part 1

MartianLifeforms
Published on Oct 23, 2015

www.martianlifeforms.com

This is a video by Tim Beech, the owner of the now 22 year old Life On Mars website established in 1997 as The Peculiar Rocks of Mars. There’s only a single video on his YouTube channel, this one, so it looks like the series he speaks of never happened.

Maybe Tim just got disillusioned in his quest? These things are unknown. But this video has mighty few views for being up for four years.

I think the similarity in pattern and shape is quite interesting, but they could actually be just rocks in odd lighting… So many minerals form perfect geometric shapes here at home, so minerals would on Mars, too. Although these examples are not rigidly similar at all, some are rounded and well, it could be something. So there.

Yes… the more I think about it the minerals are out, (noting that rocks are lumps of minerals), but although “I Want To Believe,” it might be that while it’s certainly plausible, it is certainly not probable.

The movement clip (see sidebar) that Tim discovered does still intrigue me, though. The resolution he was working with for all of these shown here is just barely adequate for pleasant viewing, let alone analysis, so, yeah, illusion and pareidolia abound. Having said that, however, note that a few of them are still — of interest. And we mustn’t forget the myriad of fantastic “rocks” that our modern rovers have happened upon. And driven past.

Hey, here’s a link to Tim’s Martian Lifeforms forum. Not a lot there, though.

Be well.

 

 

Science Newsfrom research organizations


Bird three times larger than ostrich discovered in Crimean cave

First evidence that giant ostrich-like birds once roamed Europe

Date: June 26, 2019
Source: Taylor & Francis Group
Summary: A surprise discovery in a Crimean cave suggests that early Europeans lived alongside some of the largest ever known birds, according to new research published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

FULL STORY

A surprise discovery in a Crimean cave suggests that early Europeans lived alongside some of the largest ever known birds, according to new research published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

It was previously thought that such gigantism in birds only ever existed on the islands of Madagascar and New Zealand as well as Australia. The newly-discovered specimen, discovered in the Taurida Cave on the northern coast of the Black Sea, suggests a bird as giant as the Madagascan elephant bird or New Zealand moa. It may have been a source of meat, bones, feathers and eggshell for early humans.

“When I first felt the weight of the bird whose thigh bone I was holding in my hand, I thought it must be a Malagasy elephant bird fossil because no birds of this size have ever been reported from Europe. However, the structure of the bone unexpectedly told a different story,” says lead author Dr Nikita Zelenkov from the Russian Academy of Sciences.

“We don’t have enough data yet to say whether it was most closely related to ostriches or to other birds, but we estimate it weighed about 450kg. This formidable weight is nearly double the largest moa, three times the largest living bird, the common ostrich, and nearly as much as an adult polar bear.”

It is the first time a bird of such size has been reported from anywhere in the northern hemisphere. Although the species was previously known, no one ever tried to calculate the size of this animal. The flightless bird, attributed to the species Pachystruthio dmanisensis, was probably at least 3.5 metres tall and would have towered above early humans. It may have been flightless but it was also fast.

While elephant birds were hampered by their great size when it came to speed, the femur of the current bird was relatively long and slim, suggesting it was a better runner. The femur is comparable to modern ostriches as well as smaller species of moa and terror birds. Speed may have been essential to the bird’s survival. Alongside its bones, palaeontologists found fossils of highly-specialised, massive carnivores from the Ice Age. They included giant cheetah, giant hyenas and sabre-toothed cats, which were able to prey on mammoths.

Other fossils discovered alongside the specimen, such as bison, help date it to 1.5 to 2 million years ago. A similar range of fossils was discovered at an archaeological site in the town of Dmanisi in Georgia, the oldest hominin site outside Africa. Although previously neglected by science, this suggests the giant bird may have been typical of the animals found at the time when the first hominins arrived in Europe. The authors suggest it reached the Black Sea region via the Southern Caucasus and Turkey.

The body mass of the bird was reconstructed using calculations from several formulae, based on measurements from the femur bone. Applying these formulae, the body mass of the bird was estimated to be around 450kg. Such gigantism may have originally evolved in response to the environment, which was increasingly arid as the Pleistocene epoch approached. Animals with a larger body mass have lower metabolic demands and can therefore make use of less nutritious food growing in open steppes.

“The Taurida cave network was only discovered last summer when a new motorway was being built. Last year, mammoth remains were unearthed and there may be much more to that the site will teach us about Europe’s distant past,” says Zelenkov.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Taylor & Francis Group. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Nikita V. Zelenkov, Alexander V. Lavrov, Dmitry B. Startsev, Innessa A. Vislobokova, Alexey V. Lopatin. A giant early Pleistocene bird from eastern Europe: unexpected component of terrestrial faunas at the time of early Homo arrival. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 2019; e1605521 DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2019.1605521

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis Group. “Bird three times larger than ostrich discovered in Crimean cave: First evidence that giant ostrich-like birds once roamed Europe.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 June 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190626200313.htm>.

This is FABULOUS news! Huge birds are so awesome! And so dangerous!

Whee!

I got turned onto this by a post by Corinna somewhere at the Centre for Fortean Zoology, facebook, maybe, which I cannot find the link for. So Frustrating.

 

pterosaursSorry!

I love pterosaurs.

Want so badly to see a live one.

Logistics and funding will allow no such thing at this point in the journey. Sigh. Hopin’!

Anyway, here is a nice illustration that appeared on my Facebook newsfeed. It really caught my eye.

Didn’t say who the artist is, though…

If anyone knows, please comment, eh?

Peace.