Mars

 

Hey, just think if you could see this live and in person… would it not be a grand thing?

 

 

LastImagebyOppy

Space Explorer Mike @MichaelGalanin

The very last image transmitted by Opportunity Mars Rover, on Sol 5111. Credit: NASA

My God! It’s full of stars!

Such a sad thing.

 

Charles W. Shults III

We have a new Virtual Science Center being created. This is the first gallery, devoted to some of the results of the research that I have done. I also have a few links that you will enjoy with this.

A couple of TV news spots first…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzShK8u16tw   www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y68knv2vyYw

And some material about the book…
www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0IpS2ZmgzY

Enjoy, join us in our venture, and let’s have some feedback. This is a project we can all get behind!

www.shultslaboratories.com

Hey, hey, it’s my good friend Charles! An awesome dude who doesn’t get anywhere the recognition that he should… Ooh, I remember from years ago when he ran the best Mars forum the interwebs have ever seen. Seriously, it was fanfreakintastic. Such good people. Such good memories. And not a drop of woo!

So glad to hear that the findings from all those years are getting a place of their own. I pray it catches on, especially with the young folks. It’d be just grand!

be well

 

The Source of Dunes in Chasma Boreale

HiPOD 14 Jan 2019: The Source of Dunes in Chasma Boreale

This image shows dunes during the summer, when they were free from the seasonal layer of carbon dioxide ice that covers the region for much of the year. These dunes, which are near the head of the largest trough in the North Polar cap (called Chasma Boreale), were formed by strong winds blowing down the canyon toward its mouth.

ID: ESP_018963_2650
Date: 13 August 2010
Altitude: 319 km

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Source: uahirise.org

Here via fuehrer3345’s reblogging of beautifulmars’ lovely post.

Lovely… ooh, I want to go there so badly.

be well

 

It’s a mile deep!

korolev crater Mars

DETAILS

Open/Close

  • Title Perspective view of Korolev crater
  • Released 20/12/2018 11:00 am
  • Copyright ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
  • DescriptionThis image from ESA’s Mars Express shows Korolev crater, an 82-kilometre-across feature found in the northern lowlands of Mars.This oblique perspective view was generated using a digital terrain model and Mars Express data gathered over orbits 18042 (captured on 4 April 2018), 5726, 5692, 5654, and 1412. The crater itself is centred at 165° E, 73° N on the martian surface. The image has aresolution of roughly 21 metres per pixel.This image was created using data from the nadir and colour channels of the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). The nadir channel is aligned perpendicular to the surface of Mars, as if looking straight down at the surface.
  • Id 412947

And from our dear gortex at ATS:

The Martian ice rink is located near the northern polar cap , it’s 37 miles in diameter with a depth of just over a mile and stays frozen all year round so perfect for die hard skaters to practice their moves whatever time of year.

For the full view or to download the 2.47 MB TIF image go Here for ultimate coolness.

• Mars Express celebrates it’s 15th anniversary on Christmas day, happy anniversary guys.

So lovely, so awesome!

be well

 

Raw Sounds from InSight’s Seismometer on Mars

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2018

Listen to raw, unprocessed data from the seismometer on NASA’s InSight spacecraft of vibrations caused by wind moving over the solar panels on Mars. A subwoofer or earphones are needed to hear this clip. The sounds were recorded by two of the three short-period sensors on the seismometer (SEIS). The audio is available for download at NASA.gov/sounds. JPL manages InSight for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. InSight is part of NASA’s Discovery Program, managed by the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. France’s national space agency, Centre National d’Études Spatiales (CNES), Paris, leads the consortium that provided SEIS. The principal investigator for SEIS is Philippe Lognonné of the Institute of Earth Physics of Paris (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, or IPGP). Imperial College, London, and Oxford University made the short-period sensors.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/UKSA/Imperial College London/Oxford/ETH

For years I have anxiously awaited audio from Mars. And I am smitten… regardless of the fact that this is from a seismometer and not a microphone.

I seem to recall being told a good while back that there’s a mic on Curiosity, but I am not sure, now, as we’ve certainly not heard a peep from it if it exists.

The .wav files below are from Insight Mars Wind.

00:20

More Audible Sounds from InSight’s Seismometer on Mars

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2018

More Audible Sounds from InSight’s Seismometer on Mars Listen to data from the seismometer on NASA’s InSight spacecraft of vibrations caused by Martian wind moving over the lander’s solar panels. In this version, the data have been processed to raise the frequencies by two octaves to make them more audible. Both the processed and unprocessed audio are available for download at nasa.gov/sounds.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/UKSA/Imperial College London/Oxford/ETH

better bass:

00:20

Sounds from InSight’s Pressure Sensor on Mars

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Uploaded on Dec 7, 2018

Listen to data from the air pressure sensor on NASA’s InSight lander, indicating wind blowing by on Mars. The data were sped up by a factor of 100, shortening the duration of the recording and shifting it up in frequency 100 times (a little more than six octaves).

For more information on the InSight mission, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/insight

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/Cornell

02:27

be well

 

shinyrok

rhinyshok

shinyrok

rinyshok

shinyrok

The Mars Rover has found a strange shiny object on the Mars Surface.

image credits: NASA / JPL / CalTech

NASA think they may have an idea what it could be, but they are prepared to be surprised.

Nasa has spotted a strange, shiny object lying on the Martian surface. The planet is largely red, dusty and bland, meaning that anything unusual stands out.

The latest discovery is one such object: a shiny lump that is visible on the surface. Now the team behind the Curiosity rover intends to have a proper look at the object, in the hope of finding out what it is.

Though they have their suspicions, they are ready to be surprised.

www.independent.co.uk…

They are actually going to drive over there and check it out. That’s yuge.

They’ve already shot it thrice with a laser for chemical analysis. Currently the main thought is meteorite, but the lab’s still hummin,’ so who knows, eh.

This is a nice thing.

Especially the level of interest. Seems this has been trending in a positive direction for a while now and trust me, it is a great sign (and omen, even) for the future.

be well

 

jpl

Sol 0: Instrument Context Camera (ICC)

NASA’s InSight Mars lander acquired this image of the area in front of the lander using its lander-mounted, Instrument Context Camera (ICC).

This image was acquired on November 26, 2018, Sol 0 of the InSight mission where the local mean solar time for the image exposures was 13:34:21. Each ICC image has a field of view of 124 x 124 degrees.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Oh my yes, more please!

Bravo NASA teams!

wo

NASA InSight Lander Arrives on Martian Surface

Mars has just received its newest robotic resident. NASA’s Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander successfully touched down on the Red Planet after an almost seven-month, 300-million-mile (458-million-kilometer) journey from Earth.

InSight’s two-year mission will be to study the deep interior of Mars to learn how all celestial bodies with rocky surfaces, including Earth and the Moon, formed.

InSight launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California May 5. The lander touched down Monday, Nov. 26, near Mars’ equator on the western side of a flat, smooth expanse of lava called Elysium Planitia, with a signal affirming a completed landing sequence at 11:52:59 a.m. PST (2:52:59 p.m. EST).

“Today, we successfully landed on Mars for the eighth time in human history,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “InSight will study the interior of Mars and will teach us valuable science as we prepare to send astronauts to the Moon and later to Mars. This accomplishment represents the ingenuity of America and our international partners, and it serves as a testament to the dedication and perseverance of our team. The best of NASA is yet to come, and it is coming soon.”

The landing signal was relayed to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, via NASA’s two small experimental Mars Cube One (MarCO) CubeSats, which launched on the same rocket as InSight and followed the lander to Mars. They are the first CubeSats sent into deep space. After successfully carrying out a number of communications and in-flight navigation experiments, the twin MarCOs were set in position to receive transmissions during InSight’s entry, descent and landing.

From Fast to Slow

“We hit the Martian atmosphere at 12,300 mph (19,800 kilometers per hour), and the whole sequence to touching down on the surface took only six-and-a-half minutes,” said InSight project manager Tom Hoffman at JPL. “During that short span of time, InSight had to autonomously perform dozens of operations and do them flawlessly – and by all indications that is exactly what our spacecraft did.”

Confirmation of a successful touchdown is not the end of the challenges of landing on the Red Planet. InSight’s surface-operations phase began a minute after touchdown. One of its first tasks is to deploy its two decagonal solar arrays, which will provide power. That process begins 16 minutes after landing and takes another 16 minutes to complete.

The InSight team expects a confirmation later Monday that the spacecraft’s solar panels successfully deployed. Verification will come from NASA’s Odyssey spacecraft, currently orbiting Mars. That signal is expected to reach InSight’s mission control at JPL about five-and-a-half hours after landing.

“We are solar powered, so getting the arrays out and operating is a big deal,” said Tom Hoffman at JPL. “With the arrays providing the energy we need to start the cool science operations, we are well on our way to thoroughly investigate what’s inside of Mars for the very first time.”

InSight will begin to collect science data within the first week after landing, though the teams will focus mainly on preparing to set InSight’s instruments on the Martian ground. At least two days after touchdown, the engineering team will begin to deploy InSight’s 5.9-foot-long (1.8-meter-long) robotic arm so that it can take images of the landscape.

“Landing was thrilling, but I’m looking forward to the drilling,” said InSight principal investigator Bruce Banerdt of JPL. “When the first images come down, our engineering and science teams will hit the ground running, beginning to plan where to deploy our science instruments. Within two or three months, the arm will deploy the mission’s main science instruments, the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS) and Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) instruments.”

InSight will operate on the surface for one Martian year, plus 40 Martian days, or sols, until Nov. 24, 2020. The mission objectives of the two small MarCOs which relayed InSight’s telemetry was completed after their Martian flyby.

“That’s one giant leap for our intrepid, briefcase-sized robotic explorers,” said Joel Krajewski, MarCO project manager at JPL. “I think CubeSats have a big future beyond Earth’s orbit, and the MarCO team is happy to trailblaze the way.”

With InSight’s landing at Elysium Planitia, NASA has successfully soft-landed a vehicle on the Red Planet eight times.

“Every Mars landing is daunting, but now with InSight safely on the surface we get to do a unique kind of science on Mars,” said JPL director Michael Watkins. “The experimental MarCO CubeSats have also opened a new door to smaller planetary spacecraft. The success of these two unique missions is a tribute to the hundreds of talented engineers and scientists who put their genius and labor into making this a great day.”

JPL manages InSight for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. InSight is part of NASA’s Discovery Program, managed by the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The MarCO CubeSats were built and managed by JPL. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built the InSight spacecraft, including its cruise stage and lander, and supports spacecraft operations for the mission.

A number of European partners, including France’s Centre National d’Études Spatiales (CNES) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), are supporting the InSight mission. CNES, and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), provided the SEIS instrument, with significant contributions from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany, the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETH) in Switzerland, Imperial College and Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and JPL. DLR provided the HP3 instrument, with significant contributions from the Space Research Center (CBK) of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Astronika in Poland. Spain’s Centro de Astrobiología (CAB) supplied the wind sensors.

For more information about InSight, visit:

www.nasa.gov/insight/

For more information about MarCO, visit:

www.jpl.nasa.gov/cubesat/missions/marco.php

For more information about NASA’s Mars missions, go to:

www.nasa.gov/mars

Wa hey we’re on the way!

be well

 

cf

spaceforeurope

Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin

Recent tectonics on Mars

The prominent trenches that can be seen in this Mars Express image of the Cerberus Fossae system in the Elysium Planitia region, were formed by faults that pulled the planet’s surface apart less than 10 million years ago.

Read more.

Source: esa.int

I love Mars. I’d rather be there than here. Humans are an unpleasant lifeform.

be well

 

o

NASA’s Opportunity rover appears as a blip in the center of this square. This image taken by HiRISE, a high-resolution camera onboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the dust storm over Perseverance Valley has substantially cleared. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
› Full image and caption

NASA still hasn’t heard from the Opportunity rover, but at least we can see it again.

A new image produced by HiRISE, a high-resolution camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), shows a small object on the slopes of the Red Planet’s Perseverance Valley. That object is Opportunity, which was descending into the Martian valley when a dust storm swept over the region a little more than 100 days ago.

The storm was one of several that stirred up enough dust to enshroud most of the Red Planet and block sunlight from reaching the surface. The lack of sunlight caused the solar-powered Opportunity to go into hibernation.

The rover’s team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, hasn’t heard from it since. On Sept. 11, JPL began increasing the frequency of commands it beams to the 14-year-old rover.

The tau — a measurement of how much sunlight reaches the surface — over Opportunity was estimated to be a little higher than 10 during some points during the dust storm. The tau has steadily fallen in the last several months. On Thursday, Sept. 20, when this image was taken, tau was estimated to be about 1.3 by MRO’s Mars Color Imager camera.

This image was produced from about 166 miles (267 kilometers) above the Martian surface. The white box marks a 154-foot-wide (47-meter-wide) area centered on the rover.

The University of Arizona in Tucson operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., in Boulder, Colorado. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more, visit:
https://www.uahirise.org/ESP_056955_1775

Updates about Opportunity can be found here:
https://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/status.html

News Media Contact

Andrew Good
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-2433
[email protected]

2018-224

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Oh, man, I do hope my lil buddy comes back to life!

Life on Mars, Curiosity Rover

Martian Archaeology
Published on Sep 11, 2018

NASA has found life on Mars they just won’t confirm it until they can return a sample to Earth. pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/data… mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-ima…

This is actually a pretty nice video. Only real anomalies, nicely presented with no sensationalist fanfare.

Just as it should be.

I do feel — strongly — that many of the things we have seen up there are indeed fossils.

I have no truck with NASA, though, unlike many. Science  requires them to be sure, they cannot “youtube” us, for that would ruin everything. That said I have been rather upset with them in the past, when they had some sort of agenda, probably forced upon them by libular slimeworms.

They’ve been doing great since that all ended.

Exciting times lie ahead!

be well

 

1

2

3

4

A wonderful old Martian favorite. It is intriguing, don’tcha think?

Is it? Or is it not? I really want to know. Really.

And I am more confident than ever that someday we will know.

Hopefully I’ll be around to get the update.

I love Mars. It’s just so full of wonder, how could one not?

be well

 

1

Possible critter remnant? Or critter byproduct remnant? Credit NASA/JPL

Tiny “terlet,” maybe? J/K. Sort of.

2

The latest. Good enough for them to take a second look! Only happened once before. Credit NASA/JPL All pics here.

3

4

5

Unfortunately… a false alarm… just a rock. Albeit the gol dang coolest rock we’ve seen in a long, long time!

6

Nice hole, eh? Credit NASA/JPL

We need boots on the ground.

be well

 

Martian Sand worms, Dragons, Towns and Vegetation

GreyFace
Published on Jul 27, 2018

Found these things recently in Mars satellite pictures. A giant slug like creature or should I say giant sandworm. A dragon like creature with huge wings and tail or neck, wing size 5 meters across, A huge harbor / atoll ruins now, but it looks artificial, with straight lines and strange tower like structures in the corners. A Martian town, that is just sitting out in nowhere. There are no similar objects in the area, looks like small houses. A Crash, a big size of a mountain have crumbled down due to the impact of some unidentified object, one half of the object is still sticking out. Strange black spots spreading like bacteria across the surf

GreyFace is ATS member Spacespider and he or she sometimes makes these videos to compile the long hours of scouring the surface for the good stuff. Most enjoyable. The “dragon” is completely lost on me.

Much of this brings back memories of the late J. P. Skipper, who got himself quite truly lost in the depths of interpretation and interpolation of low-res imagery — but, gol dang if he didn’t get a heckuva lot of us going in the search for anomalies in space and that is most assuredly a noble thing to have done.

I remember that my Fortean science Hero, the late, great Sir Arthur C. Clarke got his paredolia on with the infamous trees… like many of us did, me included, so, hey, good company, what? And God damn if they didn’t look just like it.

Sigh… Days of wonder, they were.

Note that I AM STILL intrigued by that “vegetation.” It may be exactly that. Note also that it is seasonal and that we can’t see it so well from orbit. Especially on the awful Google Earth. (Which does, however, have links to the real pictures.)

The thread for this vid is here.

High resolution is so important. Boots on the ground even more so.

enjoy and

be well

 

spiny

This is a crop from this shot:

spinyfar

spotted by BlueShift of ATS, I’m pretty sure, anyway, (my memory is going away), but it was a good while ago.

I will leave it up to you to have a guess as to what this, umm, “rock,” really might be.

I have some nifty thoughts tucked away. It just looks too much like a …

Dig it?

I love Mars. There are fossils layin’ out on the ground, man. I want to go there. Boots on the ground, eh. Maybe my eyes can even be fixed by then…

Prayin’ for it.

be well

 

PIA22512

Mars is just too cool.

The image is, of course, from NASA/JPL.

Sand dunes often accumulate in the floors of craters. In this region of Lyot Crater, NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) shows a field of classic barchan dunes on Jan. 24, 2018. Just to the south of the group of barchan dunes is one large dune with a more complex structure. This particular dune, appearing like turquoise blue in enhanced color, is made of finer material and/or has a different composition than the surrounding. The map is projected above at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 34.7 centimeters (13.7 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 104 centimeters (40.9 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.

Learn more and get a 14MB TIFF at  www.nasa.gov…

be well

 

Well, not quite a Sikorsky, but drones are beautiful, too, eh! WooHoo!

NASA Mars Helicopter Technology Demonstration

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Published on May 11, 2018

The Mars Helicopter is a technology demonstration that will travel to the Red Planet with the Mars 2020 rover. It will attempt controlled flight in Mars’ thin atmosphere, which may enable more ambitious missions in the future. For more information, visit https://go.nasa.gov/2IC8tIh

I was referred to this short piece from a thread called NASA will send a Helicopter to Mars in 2020 by our gortex [Knight of Ni Member Registered: 8/16/2009 Location: Valles Marineris Mood: Variable] and since this is right up my alley as Mars might convince me to stay alive, I got excited and …from there, I found these.

Crazy Engineering: Mars Helicopter

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Published on Jan 22, 2015

JPL engineers are working on a small helicopter that could ‘scout’ a trail for future Mars rovers, but getting a chopper that could fly in the Martian atmosphere is tricky. Episode 2 of Crazy Engineering.

Crazy good stuff

Here’s what a NASA drone for Mars could look like

GeoBeats News
Published on Jan 26, 2015

Hoping to expand the range of what Mars rovers can investigate, NASA is considering equipping the intrepid explorers with helicopters. Mars rovers have done a lot of great work for NASA, but their investigative range is restricted to what can be seen via their onboard cameras. Hoping to expand the options for what the intrepid explorers can look into, the space agency is considering equipping them with helicopters. The goal isn’t to make the rovers themselves fly, but to provide them with a scout that can travel quickly and send back information. Researchers on the ground could go through the data collected, determine which areas of the Red Planet look most intriguing, and send the rover along the proper path. The detachable helicopter could also be useful in aiding the search for particular areas that offer promising opportunities for in-depth analysis and sample collection. The plan is to create a flying rover assistant that weighs about 2 pounds and has a propeller span of just over 3-and-a-half feet. A proof-of-concept prototype, which according to NASA looks kind of like a tissue box, is currently being tested at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The next rover mission to Mars is scheduled to depart in 2020.

Sweet. Petite.

NASA’s Mars Drone Scout – Behold The Future

UPHIGH Productions
Published on Apr 7, 2017

Behold The Future…NASA’s new Mars drone to scout for human habitation sites. The way humans explore Mars could be about to take a giant leap forward with the invention of special flying drones to explore harder to reach parts of the red planet. NASA says the devices could help identify sites for human habitation.

Engineers from NASA’s Langley Research Center are developing a drone that can fly in the thin Martian atmosphere. The autonomous aircraft will team up with ground-based rovers to give researchers far greater flexibility in exploring currently inaccessible features, such as lava tubes and deep canyons.

As well as exploring hard to reach places, Langley engineers say the drones will scout the surface of Mars looking for suitable areas to build human habitats. The “Mars Electric Flyer” project focuses on lightweight structures powered by electric motors. These machines will have vertical takeoff and landing flight control, as well as autonomous navigation.

The electric-powered drones will be equipped with cutting edge motor and battery technologies so they can carry out long-range missions without human intervention. The machines will also be equipped with advanced mapping and remote sensor systems.

The plan is to send the aircraft to Mars on board one of NASA’s rovers. A concept video released by Langley shows the rover using a robotic arm to release the drone on the surface of the planet. The drone then takes off to explore caves and canyons before returning to the rover for post-mission recharging.

The autonomous aircraft, still in the prototype stage, is designed for the thin atmospheric conditions on Mars and is currently undergoing low-pressure chamber flight tests at Langley.
https://www.rt.com/viral/383127-mars-…

——————————————–

NASA Langley Engineers Propose Mars Flyer Concept

Imagine being able to survey more parts of another planet like Mars than ever before. Orbiters and rovers have been successful so far but engineers keep looking for new ways to gather information. One way may be by using an unmanned aerial vehicle like this Mars Flyer concept. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xjHC…

This looks rather sporty and fleet…

Should have enough air, right?

And please,

Give my regards to the Admiral, Langley.

Mars Helicopter Scout

KISSCaltech
Published on Nov 12, 2015

MiMi Aung, the Autonomous Systems Deputy Division Manager at JPL, presented the Mars Helicopter Scout at the Keck Institute for Space Studies lecture on April 1, 2015. The Mars Helicopter Scout is a current proposal to demonstrate helicopter flight at Mars on the Mars 2020 mission.The Mars Helicopter Scout will scout ahead of a planetary surface rover to provide high-resolution aerial images of the terrain for science and operational purposes. This talk described the scope of the Mars Helicopter Scout proposal, the signficant science and operational benefits of a helicopter in planetary surface exploration, and the technical design overview of Mars Helicopter Scout. The talk concluded with examples of feedforward applications of a planetary helicopter to future missions, with an invitation for lecture attendees to join in further envisioning the much bigger, broader future applications offered by this addition of an aerial dimension to the state-of-practice surface rovers and orbiters in planetary exploration today.

And there you have it.

Exciting stuff and exciting times ahead.

You may have heard the news… plans are to get one up there in 2020… just two tiny yarn!

 

peace

 

See now, this is how the moon got put into place…

Dee- lish!

Beauty.

One of many slabs stuck in the surface in a region of Mars that I can not recall the name of right now. Nifty eh?!

Here’s a nice shot of one.

A very unfortunate Sumatran rhino, which are endangered as it is; and some god damn bastard has to go and cut off it’s horn.

The individual(s) that did this is lucky our paths haven’t crossed as I would cut something off the asswipe(s) for them to remember their crime by. At least while they bled out.

Creeps me out how sick people are.

Sigh.

peace

 

It is! Chock full of really interesting stuff, this place. And lots of stuff gets a “fascinating.”

That’s a nice one.

True color by my buddy Charles Schults!

Pan of Gusev

Those are some nice looking plains.

 

 

 

Look at that. That looks fine. Like somewhere I would want to walk around and check out.

Glad we are going up!

Peace

 

Oh I remember this lil guy so well. This gif is by NASA, created way back in the day in response to the outstanding public inquiry. The “Bunny” was our first taste of the bizarre things to come.

The official conclusion was that this was a piece of airbag material from the landing that had just happened.

That official opinion was based on the proximity in time combined with the movement ‘in the light breeze’ and the yellowish coloration. They did, however, to their credit, say that it was an inconclusive finding and they couldn’t truly say exactly what it was. They kept an eye on it and it appeared next under the edge of the lander. It was not seen again, sadly.

I have always had a problem with the airbag conclusion, despite it’s theoretical plausibility. Do notice that only one “ear” moves. If it was light airbag material, would only the one move? And … how exactly would the two “ears” stand up like that? They could well be right, but to my eye —it simply doesn’t look like what they are saying— it just seems “wrong.”

YMMV Hmmm?

Think on that a while…

Peace

 

Marias Pass, Mars

Sol 991-995 Mastcam imagery projected onto Navcam meshes.
Sol 1080 Mt.Sharp Panorama

Credit: NASA, JPL/Caltech

Blender navcam import plugin by Rob Haarsma: https://github.com/phaseIV

Music: Matt Uelman – Desert

Yellowknife Bay, Mars

Curiosity Sol 137 Mastcam imagery projected onto Sol 133 Navcam meshes.

Credit: NASA, JPL/Caltech

Blender navcam import plugin by Rob Haarsma: https://github.com/phaseIV

Music: Jan Jelinek – Do Dekor
https://www.discogs.com/Jan-Jelinek-L…

Southern Flank of Husband Hill, Mars

Spirit rover sols 672-677 (Nov 23-28 2005 ) Pancam imagery projected onto Sol 671 Navcam meshes.

Credit: NASA, JPL/Caltech

Blender navcam import plugin by Rob Haarsma: https://github.com/phaseIV

Music: Alan Hovhaness – Sonata for Harp, Op. 127: ll. Lento misterioso

https://www.discogs.com/Alan-Hovhanes…

Fabulous!

Credit for these videos being available to us plebes goes to the user sittingduck at Unmanned Spaceflight, a project of The Planetary Society, which has some rather dedicated people who document Curiosity’s activities in detail on a sol-to-sol basis. Very cool. The necessary software to do this was created by Rob Haarsma. See above for the link.

[via jeep3r, rubberneck, Member; here.]

This kind of immersion is possible by creating a 3D mesh from the stereo views of Curiosity’s navigation cameras (greyscale). This means that the shapes and general dimensions of the rocks and landscape are amazingly accurate. The whole scene has been imported into Blender (a free 3D editing program), merged with high-resolution color images from Curiosity’s MastCam and all that was finally compiled into a video.

I do believe we are on our way!

And I don’t think it gets any better than that.

Dig it.

Peace

 

A Stunning Video of Mars That Took Three Months to Stitch Together—by Hand

This is from Wired magazine via Russ Hudson, who will receive PentaProps™!

IF YOU SHOULD one day find yourself in a spacecraft circling Mars, don’t count on a good view. The Red Planet’s dusty atmosphere will probably obscure any window-seat vistas of its deep valleys and soaring mesas. “The best way to see the planet’s surface would be to take a digital image and enhance it on your computer,” says planetary geologist Alfred McEwen, principle investigator on NASA’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. He would know: In the past 12 years, the powerful HiRISE camera has snapped 50,000 spectacular, high-resolution stereo images of the Martian terrain from the planet’s orbit, creating anaglyphs that anyone can view in 3D using special glasses. The highly detailed stereograms depict the planet’s surface in remarkable detail—but 3D glasses aren’t always handy, and still images can only convey so much about Mars’ varied topography.

To fully appreciate the Martian landscape, one needs dimension and movement. In the video you see here, Finnish filmmaker Jan Fröjdman transformed HiRISE imagery into a dynamic, three-dimensional, overhead view of the Red Planet—no glasses required.

For Fröjdman, creating the flyover effect was like assembling a puzzle. He began by colorizing the photographs (HiRISE captures images in grayscale). He then identified distinctive features in each of the anaglyphs—craters, canyons, mountains–and matched them between image pairs. To create the panning 3-D effect, he stitched the images together along his reference points and rendered them as frames in a video. “It was a very slow process,” he says.

Read the rest …

I’m lovin’ it!

I want to GO there … and if I can get myself on one of Elon Musk’s upcoming ships I WILL!

Full circle, eh?

Or something like that…

Peace

Nice, huh?
This image of another round rock, taken by Curiosity on Sol 1555, has been debayered, enlarged and cropped, by, I imagine, LookingAtMars, Member, who posted it and said it had been.

Yes, there are others, too!

You can find most of them here.

I found this particular one here.

Here is the link to the pic.

Peace

 

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Things to see on Mars: “go home, Erosion, you’re drunk!”

— Charles W Shults III

Indeed!

Ha!

I am just glad we are starting to see some good stuff again.

Makes sense there would be more goodies ‘round the edges, eh?

Gotta get this image number…

Peace.

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A world o’ wonder, I tell ya.

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Great, eh?

Actually, the important thing here is that the pattern of interest is easily discernible in the full, uncropped view.

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It must be so cool up there.

Reminds me of the Old Man In The Mountain in New Hampshire. I was sad when he passed and glad I had the chance to see the old coot.

Let’s all push for finding out for sure on schedule or better, okay?

It’s the right thing to do.

Peace.

Mars is raising some eyebrows again and for this I am grateful.

It’s been a long time!

Actually, the poster noted that the irascible Tom Van Flandern had seen these forms back in 1999 (on the bottom picture) and had them on his site.

He was a cool one. Wonder what he’s up to.

Could this be natural? Of course. But it has so many of the features that it’d need to have if it wasn’t and it is in such a confined area… the heart sings!

And hey, I guess we’ll all be going up there soon (Go Muskies!) so maybe we will get to see this place for real, up close and personal. Note to self: It is worth staying alive for. Even if it’s just rocks.

But hooodoggy, it sure looks good from up here, doesn’t it?

They need to get that hi res 30cm per pixel camera overhead pronto! C’mon NASA! That’ll fix it!

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Imaged in April 2009 via the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s CTX Context Camera, here’s a cropped image showing a small section of the area, slightly contrast-enhanced.

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The big picture from whence the top one is cropped, imaged via the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CTX Context Camera in April 2009.

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Above image acquired by the MOC camera on the Mars Global Surveyor in 1999. It is at a slightly lower resolution.

There’s a nice discussion at  Strange Terraced Features on Mars Reminiscent of Megalithic Structures.

It is where I first saw this.

 

This is crop from a notorious Mars Rover photo that shows what appears to be a carving that looks like it should be in Egypt. It’s about 5 feet high, if the measurements are true, and they likely are. Note also the plastic looking rounded edge object near the center. Also interesting is that this is the first such photo I’ve worked on where the color data was deleted from the released data so I had to add my own rather than bring them out of suppression… that doesn’t sit well with me.

The blurb above is at the store and has a lot of emotion in it.