Classical

 

When You Wish Upon A Star – sung by Jiminy Cricket (Cliff Edwards)

Maureen712
Jun 25, 2010

This review is from: Pinocchio (Disney Gold Classic Collection) (DVD)

The one-two whammy of audience and critical indifference to “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia” killed Walt Disney’s desire to experiment with the limits of animation in the 1940s. From then on, play it safe was his motto. This may be one of the greatest tragedies to beset popular American culture in the 20th century; despite the depths of pretension and kitch in “Fantasia,” it was at least evidence of a spirited mind in pursuit of the unattained — but “Pinocchio” must have broken old Walt’s heart. There are visual effects in this movie that remained unchallenged until the digital age, and it’s worth recalling that every single one of them was drawn by hand. It has one of the most beautiful and exciting musical scores in the history of the movies (I can’t hear Cliff Edwards’ high, pure falsetto holding that final note of “When You Wish Upon a Star” without chills), a deeply plangent sense of emotion that never tips over into bathos, and a wealth of detail that is still staggering after 65 years. But it may be too dark a movie to attain the popularity of more cheerful Disney cartoons like “Snow White” — although even that one can frighten the tots.

“When You Wish upon a Star” is a song written by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington for Walt Disney’s 1940 adaptation of Pinocchio. The original version of the song was sung by Cliff Edwards in the character of Jiminy Cricket and is heard over the opening credits and again in the final scene of the film. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song that year and has since become an icon of The Walt Disney Company. The American Film Institute ranked “When You Wish Upon A Star” seventh in their 100 Greatest Songs in Film History, the highest ranked Disney animated film song, and also one of only four Disney animated film songs to appear on the list, the others being “Some Day My Prince Will Come” from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs peaked at nineteenth, “Beauty and the Beast” from Beauty and the Beast peaked at #62, and “Hakuna Matata” from The Lion King, which peaked at #99. The song reached the top five in Billboard’s Record Buying Guide, a predecessor of the retail sales chart. Popular versions included Glenn Miller, Guy Lombardo, Horace Heidt and of course, Cliff Edwards. In Japan, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark, the song has become a Christmas song, often referring to the Star of Bethlehem. The Swedish language version is called Ser du stjärnan i det blå, roughly translated: “do you see the star in the blue(sky)”, and the Danish title is “Når du ser et stjerneskud”, which roughly translates as “When you see a shooting star”. In Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway the song is played on television every Christmas Eve’s day in the traditional Disney one-hour christmas cabaret, and the gathering of the entire family for the watching of this, is considered major Scandinavian tradition. In 2005, Julie Andrews selected the original Cliff Edwards recording for the album Julie Andrews Selects Her Favorite Disney Songs. The song has — along with Mickey Mouse — become an icon of The Walt Disney Company. In the 1950s and 60s, Walt Disney used the song in the opening sequences of Walt Disney anthology television series. It has also been used in multiple versions of Walt Disney Pictures’ opening logos — including the present-day logo — since the 1980s. The ships of the Disney Cruise Line use the first seven notes of the song’s melody as their horn signals. Additionally, many productions at Disney theme parks — particularly fireworks shows and parades — employ the song.

Song
La Estrella Azul
Artist
Pablo Palos
Writers
Ned Washington, Leigh Harline
Licensed to YouTube by
UMG (on behalf of Walt Disney Records); PEDL, EMI Music Publishing, and 8 Music Rights Societies

Yes, I remember.

There’ll never be days like those agan, Innocent, childhood days.

 

 

Frank Zappa – Pygmy Twylyte/The Idiot Bastard Son/Dickie’s Such An Asshole (Live at The Roxy 1973)

Pierre Borduas
Jan 20, 2019

Released as part of the 1974 live LP Roxy & Elsewhere, “Pygmy Twylyte” was a regular feature during Frank Zappa’s 1973-1974 tour but never reappeared afterwards. The “original” version is a short (two minutes), fast-paced song with a twisted melody exploiting all of singer Napoleon Murphy Brock’s wide range. Lyrics make absolutely no sense: “Green hocker croakin’/In the Pygmy Twylyte/Crankin’ an’ a-coke’n/In the Winchell’s do-nut Midnite.” It roughly looks like a leftover leaf from Zappa’s “life on the road” songbook or maybe a drug-addict spoof similar to “It Just Might Be a One-Shot Deal.” In any case, the lyrics are mostly irrelevant to the song — their role was to make Brock’s life as difficult as possible.

The Roxy version was recorded early in the tour and extensively overdubbed in the studio later. The performance included on You Can’t Do That on Stage Anymore, Vol. 2, from a late-1974 show, is all the more significant. Lasting almost nine minutes, it is taken at a considerably slower tempo, in an altogether different key with more mutated vocals. More importantly, it features a whole new chunk of music as it indulges in a strange progressive disco vamp — and a guitar solo of course. The two available recordings could almost be seen as entirely different pieces if it were not for their shared set of lyrics. The fact that Zappa never performed the piece after 1974 turned “Pygmy Twylyte” into an obscure title.

I love this. You’ll never know how much I love this and the whole album and concert. Even though I didn’t get to go. This was a MAJOR influence on the teenage Ig.

 

 
zappa

Guido Kämmerling to Frank Zappa

April 22, 2014 at 9:55 AM

This is a private foto we shot on Zappa’s concert on the “Loreley” in germany, autumn 1984.

A beautiful photograph of our hero.

 

 

Captain Beefheart and Frank Zappa -Lost in a Whirlpool

Saint Alfonzo
Oct 6, 2013

Recorded in 1958 with Frank Zappa on lead guitar, Bobby Zappa on rhythm guitar and of course The Captain on vocals.

A rare treasure for you all to dig.

capn n frank

peace

 

 

The Solo Show
May 8

Classical guitarist Soren Madsen performs ‘Nothing Else Matters.’

Featured: SorenMadsen.com

This is excellent!

Dig it.

 

 

Classical Gas [Mason Williams] | Songs | Tommy Emmanuel

Tommy Emmanuel
Published on Aug 29, 2011

Learn this song from Tommy via multi-angle videos, transcriptions (Guitar Pro, Powertab, PDF, notation) Full information here: truefire.com/acoustic-guitar-l…
The other songs featured in this video are: Walk Don’t Run by Johnny Smith (made famous by The Ventures) Saturday Night’s Alright For Fighting by Elton John & Bernie Taupin

Make sure you Subscribe to this YouTube Channel for new videos! Like on Facebook facebook.com/tommyemmanuel Follow on Twitter: twitter.com/tommyemmanuel Official Web Site: www.tommyemmanuel.com

Not your typical rendition of this classic piece!

Tommy is a true guitar God. One of the best that has ever lived, surely. A Chet Atkins-level finger picker!

 

 

Jethro Tull – Bourée (French TV, 1969 ‘La Joconde’)

Hector Oscar
Published on Oct 3, 2012

Song – Bourée (2001 Remaster)
Artist – Jethro Tull
Album – All the Best
Writers – Ian Anderson, Johann Sebastian Bach

Licensed to YouTube by – WMG (on behalf of PLG UK Catalog); BMG Rights Management, UMPG Publishing, LatinAutor – PeerMusic, CMRRA, ARESA, LatinAutor, and 10 Music Rights Societies

An incredibly beautiful classical song and so masterfully rendered by one of the best bands ever and Ian Anderson, the Minstrel Magnificent!