Beauty

t3

The ludicrously rare and stunningly delicious 1969 Thomassima III, a car 100% custom built from Ferrari 250 GT parts.

via reddit

My God, it’s so beautiful — I can’t stop staring at it.

You really should read the TG article because you will learn more and become aware of this man, Tom Meade’s, almost perfect storybook life. You will dig it, trust me.

pics from TG:

Up close with one of the world’s rarest coach-built Ferraris

Photography: Matt Howell

This feature was originally published in the May 2014 issue of Top Gear magazine

snip

The third Meade car, Thomassima III, is the one you see here, a gullwinged full-size Hot Wheels mostro powered by a Ferrari V12, with an exhaust system like spaghetti. It was displayed at the 1969 Turin motor show, and caused such a sensation that it made the cover of Road & Track and prompted America’s current affairs ratings juggernaut 60 Minutes to send a crew to Modena to film a segment on its creator.

snip

9 more of these info blocks await you.

It is absolutely amazing that this sort of thing happens to real people.

Ooohh if only.

be well

 

Progress launch timelapse seen from space

European Space Agency, ESA
Published on Nov 22, 2018

Timelapse of the Russian Progress MS-10 cargo spacecraft launched on 16 November 2018 at
18:14 GMT from Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst from the International Space Station. The spacecraft was launched atop a Soyuz rocket with 2564 kg of cargo and supplies. Flying at 28 800 km/h, 400 km high, the International Space Station requires regular supplies from Earth such as this Progress launch. Spacecraft are launched after the Space Station flies overhead so they catch up with the orbital outpost to dock, in this case two days later on 18 November 2018. The images were taken from the European-built Cupola module with a camera set to take pictures at regular intervals. The pictures are then played quickly after each other at 8 to 16 times normal speed. The video shows around 15 minutes of the launch at normal speed. The Progress spacecraft delivered food, fuel and supplies, including about 750 kg of propellant, 75 kg of oxygen and air and 440 l of water.

Some notable moments in this video are:
00:07 Soyuz-FG rocket booster separation.

00:19 Core stage separation.

00:34:05 Core stage starts burning in the atmosphere as it returns to Earth after having spent all its fuel.

00:34:19 Progress spacecraft separates from rocket and enters orbit to catch up with the International Space Station.

Download the video: bit.ly/ProgressLaunchTimelapse…

Follow Alexander and the Horizons mission on social media via bit.ly/AlexanderGerstESA and on bit.ly/HorizonsBlogESA.

Credits: ESA/NASA. ★ Subscribe: bit.ly/ESAsubscribe Check out our full video catalog: bit.ly/SpaceInVideos Follow ESA on Twitter: bit.ly/ESAonTwitter On Facebook: bit.ly/ESAonFacebook On Instagram: bit.ly/ESAonInstagram On Flickr: bit.ly/ESAonFlickr

ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related. Copyright information about our videos is available here: www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Term…

My eyes have difficulties nowadays with this sort of thing, but it looks spectacular, just the same!

be well

 

365GTB/4

Oh My Freakin’ God, this horse is just perfect! In any which way!

Lookitdem fender fins, baby, so 70s; and just like a BeeEmmDoubleYou!

Major respect to all involved.

Che bella macchina.

be well

 

jpl

Sol 0: Instrument Context Camera (ICC)

NASA’s InSight Mars lander acquired this image of the area in front of the lander using its lander-mounted, Instrument Context Camera (ICC).

This image was acquired on November 26, 2018, Sol 0 of the InSight mission where the local mean solar time for the image exposures was 13:34:21. Each ICC image has a field of view of 124 x 124 degrees.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Oh my yes, more please!

Bravo NASA teams!

wo

NASA InSight Lander Arrives on Martian Surface

Mars has just received its newest robotic resident. NASA’s Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander successfully touched down on the Red Planet after an almost seven-month, 300-million-mile (458-million-kilometer) journey from Earth.

InSight’s two-year mission will be to study the deep interior of Mars to learn how all celestial bodies with rocky surfaces, including Earth and the Moon, formed.

InSight launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California May 5. The lander touched down Monday, Nov. 26, near Mars’ equator on the western side of a flat, smooth expanse of lava called Elysium Planitia, with a signal affirming a completed landing sequence at 11:52:59 a.m. PST (2:52:59 p.m. EST).

“Today, we successfully landed on Mars for the eighth time in human history,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “InSight will study the interior of Mars and will teach us valuable science as we prepare to send astronauts to the Moon and later to Mars. This accomplishment represents the ingenuity of America and our international partners, and it serves as a testament to the dedication and perseverance of our team. The best of NASA is yet to come, and it is coming soon.”

The landing signal was relayed to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, via NASA’s two small experimental Mars Cube One (MarCO) CubeSats, which launched on the same rocket as InSight and followed the lander to Mars. They are the first CubeSats sent into deep space. After successfully carrying out a number of communications and in-flight navigation experiments, the twin MarCOs were set in position to receive transmissions during InSight’s entry, descent and landing.

From Fast to Slow

“We hit the Martian atmosphere at 12,300 mph (19,800 kilometers per hour), and the whole sequence to touching down on the surface took only six-and-a-half minutes,” said InSight project manager Tom Hoffman at JPL. “During that short span of time, InSight had to autonomously perform dozens of operations and do them flawlessly – and by all indications that is exactly what our spacecraft did.”

Confirmation of a successful touchdown is not the end of the challenges of landing on the Red Planet. InSight’s surface-operations phase began a minute after touchdown. One of its first tasks is to deploy its two decagonal solar arrays, which will provide power. That process begins 16 minutes after landing and takes another 16 minutes to complete.

The InSight team expects a confirmation later Monday that the spacecraft’s solar panels successfully deployed. Verification will come from NASA’s Odyssey spacecraft, currently orbiting Mars. That signal is expected to reach InSight’s mission control at JPL about five-and-a-half hours after landing.

“We are solar powered, so getting the arrays out and operating is a big deal,” said Tom Hoffman at JPL. “With the arrays providing the energy we need to start the cool science operations, we are well on our way to thoroughly investigate what’s inside of Mars for the very first time.”

InSight will begin to collect science data within the first week after landing, though the teams will focus mainly on preparing to set InSight’s instruments on the Martian ground. At least two days after touchdown, the engineering team will begin to deploy InSight’s 5.9-foot-long (1.8-meter-long) robotic arm so that it can take images of the landscape.

“Landing was thrilling, but I’m looking forward to the drilling,” said InSight principal investigator Bruce Banerdt of JPL. “When the first images come down, our engineering and science teams will hit the ground running, beginning to plan where to deploy our science instruments. Within two or three months, the arm will deploy the mission’s main science instruments, the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS) and Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) instruments.”

InSight will operate on the surface for one Martian year, plus 40 Martian days, or sols, until Nov. 24, 2020. The mission objectives of the two small MarCOs which relayed InSight’s telemetry was completed after their Martian flyby.

“That’s one giant leap for our intrepid, briefcase-sized robotic explorers,” said Joel Krajewski, MarCO project manager at JPL. “I think CubeSats have a big future beyond Earth’s orbit, and the MarCO team is happy to trailblaze the way.”

With InSight’s landing at Elysium Planitia, NASA has successfully soft-landed a vehicle on the Red Planet eight times.

“Every Mars landing is daunting, but now with InSight safely on the surface we get to do a unique kind of science on Mars,” said JPL director Michael Watkins. “The experimental MarCO CubeSats have also opened a new door to smaller planetary spacecraft. The success of these two unique missions is a tribute to the hundreds of talented engineers and scientists who put their genius and labor into making this a great day.”

JPL manages InSight for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. InSight is part of NASA’s Discovery Program, managed by the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The MarCO CubeSats were built and managed by JPL. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built the InSight spacecraft, including its cruise stage and lander, and supports spacecraft operations for the mission.

A number of European partners, including France’s Centre National d’Études Spatiales (CNES) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), are supporting the InSight mission. CNES, and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), provided the SEIS instrument, with significant contributions from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany, the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETH) in Switzerland, Imperial College and Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and JPL. DLR provided the HP3 instrument, with significant contributions from the Space Research Center (CBK) of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Astronika in Poland. Spain’s Centro de Astrobiología (CAB) supplied the wind sensors.

For more information about InSight, visit:

www.nasa.gov/insight/

For more information about MarCO, visit:

www.jpl.nasa.gov/cubesat/missions/marco.php

For more information about NASA’s Mars missions, go to:

www.nasa.gov/mars

Wa hey we’re on the way!

be well

 

bf1

 

bf2

Juvenile Platax pinnatus, or, Pinnate Batfish

source

via seatrench

These flowy lovelies are also known as Ray-Finned Fish, spadefishes, batfishes, pinnate batfish and pinnate spadefish. My heart goes out to them.

Not seeing the “bat” bit, though. Must need better lighting for that. Eh?

be well

 

6

Tree in the farm yardPaul Gauguin

Medium: oil,canvas

www.wikiart.org/en/paul-gauguin/tree-in-the-farm-yard-1874-1

via artist-gauguin

5

 

4

 

3

 

2

 

1

Tree Pareidolia by unexplained-events

be well

 

spagirls

Three young women eat spaghetti on inflatable mattresses at Lake of Capri, 1939 (AP Photo / Hamilton Wright)

Source: hauntedbystorytelling

Sounds like a tasty idea. A bit tricky to negotiate, initially, I imagine.

I bet it was some yummy sensation!

be well

 

bii

John Lennon and Paul McCartney, India 1966. Photo by Ringo Starr.

“I don’t remember the very first shots I took with a fish eye but these were really early. This one was done on small film, which means that you don’t get the full circle [from the fish eye], which is a drag. But they still look pretty good. This is the first time we went to India, not when we went with the Maharishi. We stopped in Dehli on the way back from the Philippines, and the British Airways people took us around. When you get to India you realise you don’t know what’s going on. We did have a good time in India and I suppose this shot is pretty atmospheric.” -Ringo

here due to celebratorypenguin’s reblogging of abeatle’s post of inthebeatleslife’s [Deactivated] post.

be well

 

woodwose

Hans Burgkmair I
German, 1473 – 1531
The Fight in the Forest
c. 1500/1503
pen and black ink on laid paper
Overall: 21 x 28.6 cm (8 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.)
support: 26.7 x 35.7 cm (10 1/2 x 14 1/16 in.)
Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund
1978.77.1
Not on View

This is an illustration oft used to describe the creature known as Woodwose.

I don’t often think of woodwoses, but when I do, it’s not usually with implements. But that’s just me.

be well

 

vnfc

A very nice formula car from jamesternes

More hot cars from the jamesternes collection.

pm

#GrabberBlue, #PerformanceWhite or #RaceRed #Boss302?
#📷 @fordperformanceracingschool #mustangfanclub #mustang #fordperformance #mustangmagazine #slammedstangs #supremestangs #fordmustang
#americanmuscle #mustanggt #mustangweek
www.instagram.com/p/BqIuT5xAqyc

via mustangfanclub

Patriotic Horse Skwod.

rt

1994 Reliant Tricycle in Ireland via racecarjoe

I just like ‘em.

be well

 

mbb

God, I would love to know where this is. To get a pic of my own!

Looks to be a right amiable chap. So, yeah sounds good.

I wonder if there was a time when something along these lines would have been a normal occurrence. I bet there was, way back when. Or not. I want to know!

 

jd

The Juno spacecraft, owned by NASA and operated by JPL-Caltech, SwRI and MSSS, captured this stupendous image of Jupiter whilst under the control of Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran.

Its been going viral as the clods at this moment are a hotbed of pareidolian heaven. Some see a reclining lady, some see a squid and others… see other patterns.

Whatever you see, it is undeniable that the beauty is breathtaking, to say the least.

be well